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So I plan to create a complex page with many animatable UI elements. I want to come up with a clean way to maintain the state (expanded/collapsed, highlighted, etc.) of these animatable UI elements. I have a few ideas but I just want to know if anyone knew some js framework that does this so I don't re-invent the wheel.

EDIT

My idea so far is:

1) On form post, get the state of each UI element and add it to POST data. I'm thinking of marking all UI elements I want to track state for with a special CSS class (a type of registration for tracking) and having each support some callback that will allow me to obtain their state in a polymorphic way (each UI element has it's own understanding of state e.g. expanded, selected index, highlighted, etc)

2)Create HtmlHelpers for my UI elements that can recognize the state information sent from the client and output the UI element's html in the correct state (I prefer the state be set on the server side rather than having js popping things all over the place trying to restore state on the client side...right?)

3)Not be as complex or bloated as WebControls or ViewState

Is there a framework that does stuff like that and does it way better and if not, does my proposed framework sound like a good idea?

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What's the scope of how long you plan on maintaining state? Per session? –  ataddeini May 12 '11 at 1:03
    
Initially per session. But if I build this right, I am sure I can store the state in a db if i wanted and have my "custom state management logic" work with that. I'll update my question with more details soon –  enamrik May 12 '11 at 4:40
    
I'm not aware of anything that would give you this out of the box. I just did a quick search of the repositories on Github but nothing jumped out at me (maybe worth taking a more thorough look over there as well as Codeplex). That being said your approach sounds like a good one. HtmlHelpers is the way to go I think. –  ataddeini May 12 '11 at 12:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guess KnockoutJS might help you, since you can consolidate all the data/state management logic on it and then persist it the way you like, i.e. using the .toJSON() function and sending it to the server.

And perhaps you can integrate it with @Schwarty's localStorage solution?

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I like the KnockoutJS/localStorage combo approach idea! –  Justin Schwartzenberger May 12 '11 at 5:35
    
Thank you for your suggestion. KnockoutJS looks awesome. But that's data binding with html elements. I was talking about maintaining state for UI Components (e.g. accordion, floating div) which have many html elements within them. Their state is only available via their js library object. –  enamrik May 12 '11 at 7:46
    
@enamrik Have you looked at these: knockoutjs.com/documentation/style-binding.html and knockoutjs.com/documentation/css-binding.html? You could bind, for instance, the ui-state-active class or the top and left style attributes to a view model. –  Rafael Soares May 12 '11 at 16:15

I've done something similar to this in the past and used a jQuery cookie plugin. This might be a viable option, it just depends on how long you need to maintain the state and if you can rely on the users having cookies enabled.

http://plugins.jquery.com/project/Cookie

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You could use localStorage if the user agent supports it (most do) and fall back to cookies or even session if they don't (assuming that your scope is ok with a user's UI state being saved at the individual machine level rather than keeping that state across multiple device usages). I have a post about how you can use Modernizr in MVC 3 to check for localStorage support and save/retrieve from it.
Learn how to use Modernizr from the ASP.NET MVC3 Tools Update to store user data via HTML5 localStorage

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