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struct STATE{
  uint8 bit;
  uint8 cop;
}
STATE *state_array[1024];

state_aray[0]->bit = 8;     
state_aray[0].cop =  8;
state_aray[1]->bit = 0;     
state_aray[1].cop = state_aray[1]->bit & 8 != state_aray[0]->bit & 8
state_aray[2]->bit = 12;   
state_aray[2].cop = state_aray[1]->bit & 8 != state_aray[0]->bit & 8 && state_aray[2]->bit & 8 != state_aray[1]->bit & 8
state_aray[3]->bit = 0;     
state_aray[3].cop = state_aray[1]->bit & 8 != state_aray[0]->bit & 8 && state_aray[2]->bit & 8 != state_aray[1]->bit & 8 && state_aray[3]->bit & 8 != state_aray[2]->bit & 8
state_aray[4]->bit = 8;     
state_aray[4].cop = ...

state_aray[5].cop = ... ...
...
state_aray[100].cop = ... ...... ......... ....... ......... ....... ...... ....... ............... ........ ...... ............ .... ......... ...... ..



is there a way to only use state_aray[i-1]->cop and state_aray[i-1]->bit and state_aray[i]->bit to get state_aray[i]->cop?

tks

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3  
Please rephrase your question. I have no idea what you're trying to do. –  Chris Lutz May 12 '11 at 1:11
2  
Rolled back your last edit. Questions can't be deleted if there are more than one answer. See here. –  Karl Bielefeldt May 12 '11 at 2:28
    
if your question can be deleted, there is a 'delete' link just under the tag box for 'c'. I'm not sure whether the rules have changed so that if there are answers, or answers with up-votes, then the question cannot be deleted. You could also consider flagging the moderators, and ask them to delete it for you. If the question cannot be deleted, it is best to leave it visible, possibly with a better explanation of what you're trying to do. –  Jonathan Leffler May 12 '11 at 2:35
    
You need to be consistent in your use of '.' vs '->'. Given that you have an array of pointers, you need to ensure you have initialized those pointers - signally missing in the code shown. Or you need a simple array of your structures (more plausible). For the first option, you need to use the '->' notation; for the second option, you need to use the '.' notation. Also, you should use a few parentheses, and probably a loop, or even a pair of nested loops. –  Jonathan Leffler May 12 '11 at 2:39

1 Answer 1

Won't work. There's no "I'm a member of this structure" mechanism in C, as opposed to OOP's "this" or "self" concepts. That's why in C you simply hide your structure implementation and provide functions to change the values in which you sneakily set other values.

STATE *create_state(void)
{
    STATE *retval;

    if( (retval = malloc(sizeof(STATE))) == NULL )
        return NULL;
    retval->cop = -1;
    retval->bit = 0;
    return retval;
}

void set_state(STATE *st, int val)
{
    st->bit = val;
    st->cop++;
}

int has_state_changed(STATE *st)
{
    return st->cop;
}
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