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In my ASP.NET 4 site, i get a lot of the url's with session string embedded in them. Because of this, the same page is indexed by the search engine multiple times, all with different session id's. Erlier i also used to have aspautodetectcookie string appended to the url. But i was able to remove it later.

How can I remove this session from the url - forever.

If my url is http://www.somesite.com/ViewProduct.aspx?ID=12, i want it to show like that all the time.

Here are some settings in my web.config

<authentication mode="Forms">
            <forms cookieless="UseCookies" loginUrl="~/AccessDenied.aspx" name="FORMAUTH" />
        </authentication>

<sessionState mode="InProc" cookieless="false" timeout="15" />

<anonymousIdentification cookieless="AutoDetect" enabled="false" />
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1 Answer

Change cookieless to "UseCookies" to have the session stored inside a cookie. Otherwise the session is embedded into the URL.

Here's more information from the MSDN Site

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ok how do I test if the problem has been fixed? I mean these session id's come randomnly in the url. –  Matt Kraven May 12 '11 at 1:56
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another question - if i set cookieless to true and if the client does not support cookies, what happens? –  Matt Kraven May 12 '11 at 2:03
    
You'll be able to test this by visiting a page that would be using the session & causing a post back. –  ItsPete May 12 '11 at 2:12
    
As for what happens if they're not supported, I believe it causes an error. If you need to support clients without cookies enabled you can set cookieless to "autoDetect". This will display the session string back in the URL for these clients. –  ItsPete May 12 '11 at 2:15
    
I was just reading this article beansoftware.com/ASP.NET-Tutorials/… and it says that adding cookieless = "true" session id 'will be' embedded in all page URLs. Can you explain what you meant and what this article says. –  Matt Kraven May 12 '11 at 2:15
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