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What should the code print? 0 or any garbage value or will it depend on the compiler?

#include <stdio.h>
int a;
int main() 
{ 
   printf("%d\n",a);
   return 0;
}
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1  
@Kmysrer Why don't you try it yourself? –  Oscar Mederos May 12 '11 at 3:24
2  
@Kmysrer: How did you know the question was "simple" if you didn't know the answer? –  AndreyT May 12 '11 at 3:30
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@Kmysrer: codepad.org is a free compiler available online –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham May 12 '11 at 3:32
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@Kmysrer: Can you change your title to one that is searchable for people who have a similar question in the future? –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham May 12 '11 at 3:32
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Also answering "try it and see" is often a poor answer to C and C++ questions. It doesn't tell you when you're invoking undefined or implementation-defined behavior. –  John Kugelman May 12 '11 at 3:46
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5 Answers

Global variables are initialized as 0. Automatic variables (i.e. non-static locals) are not automatically initialized.

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I found on C99 standard, Section 6.7.8.10, Initialization:

If an object that has automatic storage duration is not initialized explicitly, its value is indeterminate. If an object that has static storage duration is not initialized explicitly, then: — if it has pointer type, it is initialized to a null pointer; — if it has arithmetic type, it is initialized to (positive or unsigned) zero; — if it is an aggregate, every member is initialized (recursively) according to these rules; — if it is a union, the first named member is initialized (recursively) according to these rules.

Section 6.2.4.3 defines:

An object whose identifier is declared with external or internal linkage, or with the storage-class specifier static has static storage duration. Its lifetime is the entire execution of the program and its stored value is initialized only once, prior to program startup.

In other words, globals are initialized as 0. Automatic variables (i.e. non-static locals) are not automatically initialized.

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While it's a bit unclear what you mean by "internal", unless by "internal" you mean "automatic", the last sentence is very wrong. All variable of static storage duration, whether they have external linkage or not, are implicitly initialized to zero if not explicitly initialized. –  R.. May 12 '11 at 4:23
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I would say your code might output anything or simply anything can happen because your code invokes Undefined Behaviour as per C99.

You don't have a prototype for printf in scope.

J.2 Undefined behavior

— For call to a function without a function prototype in scope where the function is defined with a function prototype, either the prototype ends with an ellipsis or the types of the arguments after promotion are not compatible with the types of the parameters (6.5.2.2).

If the question is about initialization of global variables then a would be initialized to 0 because it has static storage duration.

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@John : If you consider the code in the original post my answer is relevant and correct. The code might be about "initialization of global variables" but it was not specifically mentioned in the question. –  Prasoon Saurav May 12 '11 at 3:45
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without automatic variable [generally what we use in function in most cases] all other variable's value is assigned to 0

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the answer is 0. Global variables are initialized to zero.

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Considering the code in the opening post this answer is incorrect. –  Prasoon Saurav May 12 '11 at 3:32
    
It's been fixed now. –  R.. May 12 '11 at 4:22
    
Oh wonder, karthik answers on a question that is potentially not asked by his alter user account. –  phresnel Sep 27 '11 at 7:26
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