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I have two functions accepting pointers as arguments, and one of them contains inside itself a call to another using its input argument, e.g.

foo(int* x)
{ 
   //... 
}

goo(int* y)
{
   //...
   foo(y) ; // I don't like this line, would prefer something like foo(&y)
}

Now, the reason I want to use pointers in the first place is so that when I call the function it is easy to see its argument might be modified by it, i.e.

foo(&xyz)

as opposed to

foo(xyz) // this looks like foo() accepts a copy, not actual variable

But now when I call foo() from goo(), I lose this visual cue of & in front of argument, since y in goo() is of type int*, or what foo() expects, and so I cannnot write foo(&y). And I'm wondering whether there is any way around it that would make it clear from call to foo() inside goo() that foo() doesn't accept a copy, but the actual variable, and that it is able to permanently alter arguent sent to it. Hmmm, I hope I don't sound too confusing :|

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If you have a problem here, the problem is with the function names, not the parameter passing. Why doesn't foo() sound like something that changes its parameter, like increment(x)? –  Bo Persson May 12 '11 at 16:16

5 Answers 5

You could say:

foo( & (*y) );

But please don't. Just learn to read the code better.

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Not that I want to encourage this pattern, but would most compilers optimize this away? –  Ryan Thompson May 12 '11 at 7:14
    
@Ryan Who knows? If you are interested, experiment. –  nbt May 12 '11 at 7:17
    
@Ryan Thompson: depends: the * operator can be overloaded. Iterators are a good example. But my guess is also that in this case, any decent compiler would indeed optimize it. –  ereOn May 12 '11 at 7:18

Why don't you just use references ?

foo(int& x)
{ 
   //... 
}

goo(int& y)
{
   //...
   foo(y);
}

It doesn't make the intent any less clearer.

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Because here again I don't have any cue that calls to foo() or goo() can permanently alter their arguments. –  Puchatek May 12 '11 at 7:14
    
@Puchatek: Actually, you do, because a well designed implementation who does not modify its parameters would mark them as const. –  ereOn May 12 '11 at 7:16
    
But you don't see it from a call, only from definition, and I would really like to be able to see that when calling the function without looking up its definition. –  Puchatek May 12 '11 at 7:18
1  
@Puchatek: That's what Intellisense and other forms of code-hinting are for. That's why you don't - and shouldn't - write C++ with Notepad. –  Boaz Yaniv May 12 '11 at 7:25
1  
@unapersson: well, I'd write it with vim if I had to, but only with code hinting or with a macro for jumping to definition. Otherwise you couldn't really know what the function you're calling is doing, whether its arguments are const or non-const, copies, references or rvalues, etc. Using vi without any specific extensions for that is plain asceticism. Sure, I could (and did) write assembly with COPY CON FILE.ASM in the old DOS days. Great geek prowess to me, but it was kinda waste of time, and not really fun. –  Boaz Yaniv May 12 '11 at 7:45

It is slightly tangential to your question, however you may want to look into const correctness (here or here).

In computer science, const-correctness is the form of program correctness that deals with the proper declaration of objects as mutable or immutable.

Whilst it will not be immediately obvious, you should be able to tell whether an argument will be modified simply by looking at a function definition rather than inspecting the function in depth. Additionally, I'm assuming that developers will respect the convention as well and not cast away the const, etc (see the second link above).

HTH

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Yes, I can of course clear out any doubts just by looking at function declaration, I was just wondering if a neat method exists to get this information from function calls. –  Puchatek May 12 '11 at 7:32
    
@Puchatek, Well, const correctness combined with code-hinting (intellisense et al.) should be able to give you this information, however I personally like using vim and tmux (although I'm not insistant on it) so I wont begrudge you if this is impractical :) –  mdec May 12 '11 at 7:37
    
vim does have code-hinting too. –  ereOn May 12 '11 at 8:02
    
@ereOn, thanks, I didn't know that. –  mdec May 12 '11 at 8:20

It seems to me that your desire to avoid references made you miss one thing: the x and y arguments of your functions are now pointers. That means foo(y) doesn't modify y at all (and indeed it can't, since it's argument is a copy of y). It modifies the value pointed by y.

I guess you are trying to find an equivalent to C#'s explicit ref modifier, but there just isn't one in C++. I know some people try to emulate this behavior with pointers, but as you've seen yourself, that won't do, since the semantics of pointers is different. In fact, pointers will actually make things even more unsafe, since you can accidentally modify their address (instead of their referenced value) directly, and that's why I think you shouldn't use them unless you really need, well, pointers.

Yeah, C++ implicit passing of references may seem unsettling to some, but that's the way it works, and it goes all through C++'s design: there's a clear aversion from being explicit and verbose. Mind you, this is not just references that are subject to this: far more important that that is the constness of arguments. You don't explicitly specify anywhere whether an argument must be const or non-const. You're not even always sure if you invoke the const or non-const version of a member function. And that's OK, because you should be able to inspect the function declaration using intellisense or by jumping to its declaration with a hotkey.

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Well, I guess I will learn to live with it. –  Puchatek May 12 '11 at 7:49

That is not possible. The only way I see is to put a comment (plain and simple):

goo(int* y)
{
   //...
   foo(y) ; // foo receives pointer y and its content can be modified
}
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