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as far as i know when runtime come across the statement below it wraps the rest of the function as a callback to the method which is invoked asynchronously (someCall() in this example). in this case anotherCall() will be executed as a callback to someCall():

    await someCall();
    await anotherCall();

I wonder if it is possible to make runtime perform like this: call someCall() in async fashion and return immidatelly to the calling thread, then invoke anotherCall() similarly (without waiting someCall to complete). because i need these 2 methods run asynchronously and suppose these calls are just fire and forget calls.

so is it possible to implement this scenario using just async and await (not using old begin/end mechanism)?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The async/await includes a few operators to help with parallel composition, such as WhenAll and WhenAny.

var taskA = someCall(); // Note: no await
var taskB = anotherCall(); // Note: no await

// Wait for both tasks to complete.
await Task.WhenAll(taskA, taskB);

// Retrieve the results.
var resultA = taskA.Result;
var resultB = taskB.Result;
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The simplest way is probably to do this:

var taskA = someCall();
var taskB = someOtherCall();
await taskA;
await taskB;

This is especially nice if you want the result values:

var result = await taskA + await taskB;

so you don't need to do taskA.Result.

TaskEx.WhenAll might be faster than two awaits after each other. i don't know since I haven't done performance investigation on that, but unless you see a problem I think the two consecutive awaits reads better, especially if you ewant the result values.

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The Async CTP is no longer needed provided you're using .NET 4.5. Note that the async functionality is implemented by the compiler so .NET 4 apps can use it but VS2012 is required to compile it.

TaskEx is not needed anymore. The CTP couldn't modify the existing framework so it used extensions to accomplish things that the language would handle in 5.0. Just use Task directly.

So herewith, I have re-written the code(answered by Stephen Cleary) by replacing TaskEx with Task.

var taskA = someCall(); // Note: no await
var taskB = anotherCall(); // Note: no await

// Wait for both tasks to complete.
await Task.WhenAll(taskA, taskB);

// Retrieve the results.
var resultA = taskA.Result;
var resultB = taskB.Result;
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In your scenario, someCall and anotherCall will be executed consecutively, but not until someone either blocks or awaits the surrounding async method:

async Task SomeCalls() {
   await someCall();
   await anotherCall();
}

// this does not execute the calls
var t = SomeCalls();

// this does
t.Wait();

Since you can await someCall and anotherCall both must be returning a Task, so to fire and forget both, you can just do

someCall.Start();
anotherCall.Start();
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1  
I think this answer is bad since: 1) t.Wait() will block the thread 2) someCall.Start() is definitly not needed. An async method returns a task that is already started. await just waits for it to complete, it does not start it. –  Cellfish Jan 18 '12 at 20:34

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