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iPhone development - what is the difference between a development and distribution provisioning?

What is the difference between development and distribution tab under certificate in iOS Provision Portal? Which one should be used and when? Is there any apple's strict criteria to choose them?

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marked as duplicate by Jeff Atwood May 15 '11 at 6:47

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You use developer certificate for when you want to install the applications using XCode - mostly when developing.

Distribution certificates are required when you want to put an app on the App Store or when you want to send an AdHoc build to testers (which they can install themselves without using Xcode).

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OK, Thanks. Can u tell me how we install the applications using XCode when developing. –  Archana Chaurasia May 12 '11 at 9:37
    
! choose device on the top left drop down combo. then build and run. –  karim May 12 '11 at 11:00
    
I have been emailing bits (ipa file) built using a development profile using development certificate with no problem. I am still not clear on the real difference between the two and why there are two in the first place which adds to my confusion –  godzilla May 1 '13 at 17:45
    
@user1054503: So, with the development certificate you're limited to 100 test devices that you specify in your Apple developer account. There's no difference in the certificates themselves other than the separation Apple does for you. When you submit a build to Apple using a distribution certificate they will re-sign the build using their root-certificate. Comparable to how SSL-certificates work, the development certificate would be the equivalent of a self-signed certificate. –  iceydee May 2 '13 at 16:54

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