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How to script a comparison of a number against a range?

1 is not within 2-5

or

3 is within 2-5

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7 Answers 7

It's even better in Perl6.

Chained comparison operators:

if( 2 <= $x <= 5 ){
}

Smart-match operator:

if( $x ~~ 2..5 ){
}

Junctions:

if( $x ~~ any 2..5 ){
}

Given / When operators:

given( $x ){
  when 2..5 {
  }
  when 6..10 {
  }
  default{
  }
}
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So much of Perl 6 looks awesome that I think I can forgive the few things that don't. –  Chris Lutz Feb 28 '09 at 5:55
    
I think that smart match works in perl510 too? –  jettero Feb 28 '09 at 13:48
1  
Given/When also works in 5.10, it's one of the things that was back-ported to Perl5. –  Brad Gilbert Feb 28 '09 at 15:09
1  
Truly, when Perl 6 arrives it will change the way your grandchildren write code. –  j_random_hacker Feb 28 '09 at 15:32
1  
@j_random_hacker: "doesn't exist yet" is out of date FUD. you could say "not yet released", but it sure does exist: perl.com/download.csp#perl6 –  ysth Mar 1 '09 at 11:07

In Perl:

if( $x >= lower_limit && $x <= upper_limit ) {
   # $x is in the range
}
else {
   # $x is not in the range
}
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appreciate the quick replies! –  noobbk Feb 28 '09 at 4:46
    
Um ... I think some sigils are missing. Perl probably does the right thing but you might also want to keep in mind that perl uses floating point as default for numbers, so you have the potential for the 0.999999... == 1.0 problem. But I'm an old Fortran programmer, so discount my words accordingly. –  jaredor Feb 28 '09 at 5:25
    
Recent perls try hard to keep integers stored as such. –  ysth Mar 1 '09 at 4:25
    
thanks for the edits brian. The invisible $ in perl frequently bites me. –  Adnan Mar 1 '09 at 5:25
    
I prefer if( lower_limit <= $x && $x <= upper_limit ). –  Brad Gilbert Mar 1 '09 at 14:59

In bash:

$ if [[ 1 -gt 2 && 1 -lt 5 ]]; then echo "true"; fi
$ if [[ 3 -gt 2 && 1 -lt 5 ]]; then echo "true"; fi
true
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Just for fun: if seq $lo $hi | grep -w $num; then echo yes indeedy sir; fi –  ysth Mar 1 '09 at 4:22
2  
if (( lower <= x && x <= upper )); then echo true; fi –  Brad Gilbert Mar 1 '09 at 20:57

The smart match operator is available in Perl 5.10, too:

if ( $x ~~ [2..5] ) {
    # do something
}
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So is Given/When. –  Brad Gilbert Mar 1 '09 at 15:00
    
yeah, and any {$_ == $x} 2..5 can be done using List::MoreUtils –  hillu Mar 1 '09 at 21:37
    
or Quantum::Superpositions. but that or L::MU's any are so horrifically expensive that it curdles my prematurely optimizing blood to think of using them for trivial tests. –  ysth Mar 2 '09 at 2:20

In Bash:

x=9; p="\<$x\>"; if [[ $(echo {10..20}) =~ $p ]]; then echo true; else echo false; fi

Edited to correctly handle conditions as noted in the comment below.

rangecheck () { local p="\<$1\>"; if [[ $(echo {10..20}) =~ $p ]]; then echo true; else echo false; fi; }
for x in {9..21}; do rangecheck "$x"; done
false
true
.
.
.
true
false
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Fails as if [[ $(echo {10..20}) =~ 9 ]]; then echo true; fi returns true. Good idea though, could be improved? (I lack much bash knowledge) –  Shrikant Sharat Nov 8 '11 at 13:32
    
@ShrikantSharat: I have edited my answer to correct that problem. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Dennis Williamson Nov 9 '11 at 0:15

The [[ version of test has supported regular expressions since Bash 3.0.

[[ 3 =~ ^[2-5]$ ]]; echo $? # 0

The numeric comparison operators in test sometimes return an error if the input isn't numeric:

[[ 1a -ge 1 ]]; echo $? # value too great for base (error token is "1a")
[[ '$0' -le 24 ]] # syntax error: operand expected (error token is "$o")

You can test if the input is an integer with =~:

x=a23; [[ "$x" =~ ^[0-9]+$ && "$x" -ge 1 && "$x" -le 24 ]]; echo $? # 1
x=-23; [[ "$x" =~ ^-?[0-9]+$ && "$x" -ge -100 && "$x" -le -20 ]]; echo $? # 0
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In perl

grep {/^$number$/} (1..25);

will give you a true value if the number is in the range and a false value otherwise.

For example:

[dsm@localhost:~]$ perl -le 'print "has `$ARGV[0]`" if grep {/^$ARGV[0]$/} (1..25)' 4
has `4`
[dsm@localhost:~]$ perl -le 'print "has `$ARGV[0]`" if grep {/^$ARGV[0]$/} (1..25)' 456
[dsm@localhost:~]$
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"will give you a non-empty list" - actually, perl will return true/false when grep is used in scalar context (like in your examples) - and newer perls also short circuit in this case, iirc. –  user55400 Mar 2 '09 at 13:22
    
thanks for the correction –  dsm Mar 2 '09 at 13:44
1  
Try it with 3.141592653 –  tchrist Nov 9 '11 at 0:49

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