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I want to lock on two objects at the same time. Why can't I write like such code?

lock (obj1, obj2)

Should I always write like that?

lock (obj1)
{
    lock (obj2)
    {
    }
}

Probably this could be make simpler? Likely it would be better to introduce special private object and use it for a lock...

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1  
Why? I somehow think you only need 1 lock. –  Henk Holterman May 12 '11 at 9:07

8 Answers 8

up vote 15 down vote accepted

That is the correct way to lock on multiple objects, yes.

My guess is that the reason for only allowing a single argument to the lock statement is to make the order in which locks are taken as clear as possible.

Note that you must see to it that the two locks are taken in the same order everywhere in your code, or you have a potential for deadlocks.

You could also, as you suggest, introduce a single dedicated lock object, but that would make your locking more coarse. It all depends on your needs. If you sometimes only need one of the locks, you should keep them separate (but make sure to preserve lock ordering, as mentioned above).

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If you write code like this, you need to make sure, that you always lock those two objects in this order. Otherwise, you might run into deadlocks.

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1  
+1. Just what I was thinking. –  Steven May 12 '11 at 9:17

Well, this question is way too old but, here is a compact one I figured out, both codes will end up to the same compiled statements (this and the one in the question description):

    lock (obj1) lock (obj2)
    {
        // your code
    }
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Locking here doesn't mean that for duration of the lock no other code on other thread can access or modify the object. If you lock an object any other thread can modify the object at the same time. What lock code block allows you to do is to make the code inside the lock block to be single entry i.e only one thread can execute the lock code block once and other threads who tries to execute the same code block will have to wait till the owner thread is done with executing the code block. So basically you really don't need to lock 2 or more objects in usual cases. By locking your purpose is to make the code block single entry

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The reason you have to do it as you wrote it, is because you can't lock two objects in the same time; You lock them one after the other (and it is very important to keep the order of the lock, otherwise you might run in to deadlocks), and it's better to be as explicit as you can with these things.

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Do something like

    internal static void DuoEnter(object po1, object po2, int pnTimeOutMs = 1000)
    {
        if ((po1 == null) && (po2 == null))
            return;
        int nMaxLoops = 100 * pnTimeOutMs;
        bool lOneProcessor = Environment.ProcessorCount < 2;
        for (int nLoops = 0; nLoops < nMaxLoops; nLoops++)
        {
            if ((po1 == null) || (po2 == null) || (po1 == po2))
            {
                if (Monitor.TryEnter(po1 ?? po2))
                    return;
            }
            else
            {
                if (Monitor.TryEnter(po1))
                    if (Monitor.TryEnter(po2))
                        return;
                    else
                        Monitor.Exit(po1);
            }
            if (lOneProcessor || (nLoops % 100) == 99)
                Thread.Sleep(1); // Never use Thread.Sleep(0)
            else
                Thread.SpinWait(20);
        }
        throw new TimeoutException(
            "Waited more than 1000 mS trying to obtain locks on po1 and po2");
    }

    internal static void DuoExit(object po1, object po2)
    {
        if ((po1 == null) && (po2 == null))
            return;
        if (po1 == null || po2 == null || po1 == po2)
            Monitor.Exit(po2 ?? po1);
        else
        {
            Monitor.Exit(po2);
            Monitor.Exit(po1);
        }
    } 
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1  
Interesting idea, but it feels kinda like I'm sneaking through the window into a building that has a boarded-up front door. If something like this were a good idea, why wouldn't it be baked into C# proper? –  Nathan Jun 13 '12 at 23:29

Instead of locking the objects themselves, you create a dedicated object called PadLock or similar and only lock that one where it is needed.

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Just out of curiosity: when we lock the PadLock does it also lock all its contents? So if padlock refers to an instance of MyClass can any other thread get a lock on that very instance now? –  Jakub May 12 '11 at 9:07
    
@Jakub: Yes, it can. Locking a PadLock instance with lock isn't going to lock any objects contained in it. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 12 '11 at 9:19

I have encountered the same kind of problem, and wrote this snippet that might help you out, even though it is far from perfect :

private void MultiLock(object[] locks, WaitCallback pFunc, int index = 0)
{
    if (index < locks.Count())
    {
        lock (locks[index])
        {
            MultiLock(locks, pFunc, index + 1);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(pFunc);
    }
}

And then, just call this method like this :

public object LockedObject1 = new Object();
public object LockedObject2 = new Object();

public void MyFunction(object arg)
{
    WaitCallback pFunc = delegate
    {
        // Operations on locked objects
    }

    MultiLock(new object[] {LockedObject1, LockedObject2}, pFunc);
}
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