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I know that xhtml doesn't support nested form tags and I have already read other answers
here in stackoverflow regarding this subject, but I still haven't figured out an elegant solution to the problem.

Some say you don't need it and that they can't think of a scenario were this would be needed. Well, personally I can't think of a scenario that I HAVEN'T needed it.

Let's see a very simple example:

You are making a blog app and you have a form with some fields for creating a new post and a toolbar with "actions" like "Save", "Delete", "Cancel".

<form   
 action="/post/dispatch/too_bad_the_action_url_is_in_the_form_tag_even_though_conceptually_every_submit_button_inside_it_may_need_to_post_to_a_diffent_distinct_url"  
method="post">  

    <input type="text" name="foo" /> <!-- several of those here -->  
    <div id="toolbar">
        <input type="submit" name="save" value="Save" />
        <input type="submit" name="delete" value="Delete" />
        <a href="/home/index">Cancel</a>
    </div>
</form>

Our objective is to write the form in a way that doesn't require javascript, just plain old html form and submit buttons.

Since the action url is defined in the Form tag and not in each individual submit button, our only option is to post to a generic url and then start "if...then...else" to determine the name of the button that was submitted. Not very elegant, but our only choice, since we don't want to rely on javascript.

The only problem is that pressing "Delete", will submit ALL the form fields on the server even though the only thing needed for this action is a Hidden input with the post-id. Not very big deal in this small example, but I have forms with hundreds (so to speak) of fields and tabs in my LOB applications that (because of requirements) have to submit everything in one-go and in any case this seems very inefficient and a waste. If form nesting was supported, I would at least be able to wrap the "Delete" submit button inside it's own form with only the post-id field.

You may say "Just implement the "Delete" as a link instead of submit". This would be wrong in so many levels, but most importantly because Side-effect actions like "Delete" here, should never be a GET request.

So my question (particularly to those that say they haven't needed form nesting) is What do YOU do? Is there any elegant solution that I'm missing or the bottom line is really "Either require javascript or submit everything"?

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14  
It's funny, but XHTML does allow indirect form nesting according interesting note anderwald.info/internet/nesting-form-tags-in-xhtml - (X)HTML disallows nesting forms like "form > form", but allows "form > fieldset > form", W3 validator says it is valid, but browsers have bugs with such nesting. –  Nishi May 14 '10 at 7:09

16 Answers 16

up vote 39 down vote accepted

I would implement this exactly as you described: submit everything to the server and do a simple if/else to check what button was clicked.

And then I would implement a Javascript call tying into the form's onsubmit event which would check before the form was submitted, and only submit the relevant data to the server (possibly through a second form on the page with the ID needed to process the thing as a hidden input, or refresh the page location with the data you need passed as a GET request, or do an Ajax post to the server, or...).

This way the people without Javascript are able to use the form just fine, but the server load is offset because the people who do have Javascript are only submitting the single piece of data needed. Getting yourself focused on only supporting one or the other really limits your options unnecessarily.

Alternatively, if you're working behind a corporate firewall or something and everybody has Javascript disabled, you might want to do two forms and work some CSS magic to make it look like the delete button is part of the first form.

share|improve this answer
11  
the OP original stated no javascript –  Jason Feb 28 '09 at 6:31
17  
The problem with this method is that it is non-RESTful. A save and delete correspond to different actions on the resource: "Save" -> POST /my_resource (creating a new resource) "Save" -> PUT /my_resource (modifying an existing resource) "Delete" -> DELETE /my_resource (destroy the resource) RESTfully speaking, the problem is that a POST is expected to create a new resource. Certainly it should never delete an existing resource. –  user132447 Feb 25 '12 at 14:11

I know this is an old question, but HTML5 offers a couple new options.

The first is to separate the form from the toolbar in the markup, add another form for the delete action, and associate the buttons in the toolbar with their respective forms using the form attribute.

<form id="saveForm" action="/post/dispatch/save" method="post">
    <input type="text" name="foo" /> <!-- several of those here -->  
</form>
<form id="deleteForm" action="/post/dispatch/delete" method="post">
    <input type="hidden" value="some_id" />
</form>
<div id="toolbar">
    <input type="submit" name="save" value="Save" form="saveForm" />
    <input type="submit" name="delete" value="Delete" form="deleteForm" />
    <a href="/home/index">Cancel</a>
</div>

This option is quite flexible, but the original post also mentioned that it may be necessary to perform different actions with a single form. HTML5 comes to the rescue, again. You can use the formaction attribute on submit buttons, so different buttons in the same form can submit to different URLs. This example just adds a clone method to the toolbar outside the form, but it would work the same nested in the form.

<div id="toolbar">
    <input type="submit" name="clone" value="Clone" form="saveForm"
           formaction="/post/dispatch/clone" />
</div>

http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/#attributes-for-form-submission

The advantage of these new features is that they do all this declaratively without JavaScript. The disadvantage is that they are not supported on older browsers, so you'd have to do some polyfilling for older browsers.

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4  
+1 This is excellent! –  Daniel Liuzzi May 5 '12 at 20:22
4  
+1 -- but it would be lovely to know what the browser support for form= is -- CanIUse doesn't really say. caniuse.com/#feat=forms –  AKX May 15 '12 at 14:38
2  
It is bad practice to use <input> to declare buttons. the <button> element was introduced 15 years ago for this purpose. Really people. –  Nicholas Dec 6 '12 at 14:21
14  
Your point is needlessly contentious and irrelevant to the OP's question. The OP asked about the form nesting limitation without using JavaScript and the answer offers a solution. Whether you use <input> or <button> elements is irrelevant, although buttons are usually more appropriate for toolbars, as you say. By the way, button elements have not been supported by all the browsers for 15 years. –  shovavnik Dec 15 '12 at 13:56
2  
@AKX Although an old statement, you will be able to view the support for this feature here: html5test.com/compare/feature/form-association-form.html. IE is a write-off, most other desktop browsers seem tolerable. –  fatty Dec 22 '13 at 3:57

can you have the forms side by side on the page, but not nested. then use CSS to make all the buttons line up pretty?

<form method="post" action="delete_processing_page">
   <input type="hidden" name="id" value="foo" />
   <input type="submit" value="delete" class="css_makes_me_pretty" />
</form>

<form method="post" action="add_edit_processing_page">
   <input type="text" name="foo1"  />
   <input type="text" name="foo2"  />
   <input type="text" name="foo3"  />
   ...
   <input type="submit" value="post/edit" class="css_makes_me_pretty" />
</form>
share|improve this answer
4  
Yes and it feels way too hackish. Plus in a very large page (imagine tabs and sub-tabs and nesting submit buttons in several scope levels) it's almost impossible to completely separate the elements' screen position from their position in the document. –  gCoder Feb 28 '09 at 6:42
3  
well, its always a balance between what you want to do and what you can do. it looks like those are the options - either one form handled on the server, or one multiple forms that become difficult to maintain - choose wisely :) –  Jason Feb 28 '09 at 6:50
3  
Yes, unfortunately with all those limitations in html, I'll just stick to what's supported and send the whole form to the server and afterwards use javascript unobtrusively for the clients that support it to intercept the form submition and only send what's really needed. That's the best compromise. –  gCoder Feb 28 '09 at 6:58

HTML5 has an idea of "form owner" - the "form" attribute for input elements. It allows to emulate nested forms and will solve the issue.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks like the correct solution to me - the entry describing form owners in the W3C spec is here: w3.org/TR/html5/… ... and you could use some unobtrusive JS (jQuery) to make this work in older browsers with JS enabled. –  mindplay.dk Oct 6 '11 at 19:01

Kind of old topic, but this one might be useful for someone:

As someone mentioned above - you can use dummy form. I had to overcome this issue some time ago. At first I totally forgot about this HTML restriction and just added the nested forms. Result was interesting - I lost my first form from the nested. Then it turned out to be some kind of a "trick" to simply add a dummy form (that will be removed from the browser) before the actual nested forms.

In my case it looks like this:

<form id="Main">
  <form></form> <!--this is the dummy one-->
  <input...><form id="Nested 1> ... </form>
  <input...><form id="Nested 1> ... </form>
  <input...><form id="Nested 1> ... </form>
  <input...><form id="Nested 1> ... </form>
  ......
</form>

Works fine with Chrome, FireFox and Safari. IE up to 9 (not sure about 10) and Opera does not detect parameters in the main form. The $_REQUEST global is empty, regardless of the inputs. Inner forms seems to work fine everywhere.

Haven't tested another suggestion described here - fieldset around nested forms.

EDIT: Frameset didn't work! I simply added Main form after the others (no more nested forms) and used jQuery's "clone" to duplicate inputs in the form on button click. Added .hide() to each of the cloned inputs to keep layout unchanged and now it works like a charm.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked perfectly for me. I was working on an asp.net page, which had an all-enclosing form. I had an inner nested form to use for the jQuery Validation plugin ( github.com/jzaefferer/jquery-validation ), and while it worked perfectly in FireFox and IE, it failed in Chrome with 'TypeError: Cannot call method 'element' of undefined'. Turned out the validate() initialization call was failing as it couldn't find the inner form, as Chrome removed it from the block of html added using jQuery.html(). Adding a small dummy form first caused Chrome to leave the real one. –  John - Not A Number Nov 21 '13 at 6:12
    
This worked for me. Thanks for this nice hack –  Ashraf Sabry Jul 22 at 11:28

I think Jason's right. If your "Delete" action is a minimal one, make that be in a form by itself, and line it up with the other buttons so as to make the interface look like one unified form, even if it's not.

Or, of course, redesign your interface, and let people delete somewhere else entirely which doesn't require them to see the enormo-form at all.

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One way I would do this without javascript would be to add a set of radio buttons that define the action to be taken:

  • Update
  • Delete
  • Whatever

Then the action script would take different actions depending on the value of the radio button set.

Another way would be to put two forms on the page as you suggested, just not nested. The layout may be difficult to control though:

<form name="editform" action="the_action_url"  method="post">
   <input type="hidden" name="task" value="update" />
   <input type="text" name="foo" />
   <input type="submit" name="save" value="Save" />
</form>

<form name="delform" action="the_action_url"  method="post">
   <input type="hidden" name="task" value="delete" />
   <input type="hidden" name="post_id" value="5" />
   <input type="submit" name="delete" value="Delete" />
</form>

Using the hidden "task" field in the handling script to branch appropriately.

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Use an iframe for the nested form. If they need to share fields, then... it's not really nested.

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1  
Using an iframe is a great idea, it's just a shame that in most cases you would need javascript to resize it (since you cannot know what the user's text size will be, hence, how big the button will be). –  Nicholas Sep 7 '11 at 11:05
    
@Nicholas, how can you use Javascript to resize it? The iframed HTML cannot talk to the iframe, and vice-versa, unless they're on the same domain. –  Yar Sep 7 '11 at 14:02
    
I have provided the code in a second answer. –  Nicholas Sep 9 '11 at 7:47
    
@Nicholas, thanks, just wanted to make sure they have to be in the same domain –  Yar Sep 10 '11 at 0:54
    
can you put some code ? –  Francisco Corrales Morales Sep 8 at 14:38

Well, if you submit a form, browser also sends a input submit name and value. So what yo can do is

<form   
 action="/post/dispatch/too_bad_the_action_url_is_in_the_form_tag_even_though_conceptually_every_submit_button_inside_it_may_need_to_post_to_a_diffent_distinct_url"  
method="post">  

    <input type="text" name="foo" /> <!-- several of those here -->  
    <div id="toolbar">
        <input type="submit" name="action:save" value="Save" />
        <input type="submit" name="action:delete" value="Delete" />
        <input type="submit" name="action:cancel" value="Cancel" />
    </div>
</form>

so on server side you just look for parameter that starts width string "action:" and the rest part tells you what action to take

so when you click on button Save browser sends you something like foo=asd&action:save=Save

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My solution is to have the buttons call JS functions which write and then submit forms outwith the main form

<head>
<script>
function removeMe(A, B){
        document.write('<form name="removeForm" method="POST" action="Delete.php">');
        document.write('<input type="hidden" name="customerID" value="' + A + '">');
        document.write('<input type="hidden" name="productID" value="' + B + '">');
        document.write('</form>');
        document.removeForm.submit();
}
function insertMe(A, B){
        document.write('<form name="insertForm" method="POST" action="Insert.php">');
        document.write('<input type="hidden" name="customerID" value="' + A + '">');
        document.write('<input type="hidden" name="productID" value="' + B + '">');
        document.write('</form>');
        document.insertForm.submit();
}
</script>
</head>

<body>
<form method="POST" action="main_form_purpose_page.php">

<input type="button" name="remove" Value="Remove" onclick="removeMe('$customerID','$productID')">
<input type="button" name="insert" Value="Insert" onclick="insertMe('$customerID','$productID')">

<input type="submit" name="submit" value="Submit">
</form>
</body>
share|improve this answer

I went around the issue by including a checkbox depending on what form the person wanted to do. Then used 1 button to submit the whole form.

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Welcome to Stack Overflow. It's better to describe how this solves the problem, rather than just saying what you did. See How to Answer for tips on creating great answers on Stack Overflow. Thank you! –  Qantas 94 Heavy Nov 23 '13 at 6:15

This discussion is still of interest to me. Behind the original post are "requirements" which the OP seems to share - i.e. a form with backwards compatibility. As someone whose work at time of writing must sometimes support back to IE6 (and for years to come), I dig that.

Without pushing the framework (all organisations are going to want to reassure themselves on compatibility/robustness, and I'm not using this discussion as justification for the framework), the Drupal solutions to this issue are interesting. Drupal is also directly relevant because the framework has had a long time policy of "it should work without Javascript (only if you want)" i.e. the OP's issue.

Drupal uses it's rather extensive form.inc functions to find the triggering_element (yes, that's the name in code). See the bottom of the code listed on the API page for form_builder (if you'd like to dig into details, source is recommended - drupal-x.xx/includes/form.inc). The builder uses automatic HTML attribute generation and, via that, can on return detect which button was pressed, and act accordingly (these can be set up to run separate processes too).

Beyond the form builder, Drupal splits data 'delete' actions into separate urls/forms, likely for the reasons mentioned in the original post. This needs some sort of search/listing step (groan another form!, but is user-friendly) as a preliminary. But this has the advantage of eliminating the "submit everything" issue. The big form with the data is used for it's intended purpose, data creation/updating (or even a 'merge' action).

In other words, one way of working round the problem is to devolve the form into two, then the problem vanishes (and the HTML methods can be corrected through a POST too).

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If you really don't want to use multiple forms (as Jason sugests), then use buttons and onclick handlers.

<form id='form' name='form' action='path/to/add/edit/blog' method='post'>
    <textarea name='message' id='message'>Blog message here</textarea>
    <input type='submit' id='save' value='Save'>
</form>
<button id='delete'>Delete</button>
<button id='cancel'>Cancel</button>

And then in javascript (I use jQuery here for easyness) (even though it is pretty overkill for adding some onclick handlers)

$('#delete').click( function() {
   document.location = 'path/to/delete/post/id'; 
});
$('#cancel').click( function() {
   document.location = '/home/index';
});

Also I know, this will make half the page not work without javascript.

share|improve this answer
1  
Unless I've overlooked something, this is no better than linking to the delete action: the end result will be a GET request to the delete action (bad). In fact it's a bit grosser, since it requires JavaScript to accomplish something that a plain old link tag could do. –  Kyle Fox Feb 25 '11 at 0:49

In response to a question posted by Yar in a comment to his own answer, I present some JavaScript which will resize an iframe. For the case of a form button, it is safe to assume the iframe will be on the same domain. This is the code I use. You will have to alter the maths/constants for your own site:

function resizeIFrame(frame)
{
    try {
        innerDoc = ('contentDocument' in frame) ? frame.contentDocument : frame.contentWindow.document;
        if('style' in frame) {
            frame.style.width = Math.min(755, Math.ceil(innerDoc.body.scrollWidth)) + 'px';
            frame.style.height = Math.ceil(innerDoc.body.scrollHeight) + 'px';
        } else {
            frame.width = Math.ceil(innerDoc.body.scrollWidth);
            frame.height = Math.ceil(innerDoc.body.scrollHeight);
        }
    } catch(err) {
        window.status = err.message;
    }
}

Then call it like this:

<iframe ... frameborder="0" onload="if(window.parent && window.parent.resizeIFrame){window.parent.resizeIFrame(this);}"></iframe>
share|improve this answer

Alternatively you could assign the form actiob on the fly...might not be the best solution, but sure does relieve the server-side logic...

<form name="frm" method="post">  
    <input type="submit" value="One" onclick="javascript:this.form.action='1.htm'" />  
    <input type="submit" value="Two" onclick="javascript:this.form.action='2.htm'" />  
</form>
share|improve this answer
3  
-1, inline event handlers should not be encouraged. –  StackOverflowNewbie Aug 5 '11 at 8:48
    
Why? I'm asking seriously, because there is no easy way to get which button was clicked.Are you saying that something like jQuery's click() method should be used to set the button's onclick handler? Or that handling the click event before the form is submitted is the problem? –  Zack Morris Nov 12 '12 at 22:24

I just came up with a nice way of doing it with jquery.

<form name="mainform">    
    <div id="placeholder">
    <div>
</form>

<form id="nested_form" style="position:absolute">
</form>

<script>
   $(document).ready(function(){
      pos = $('#placeholder').position();
      $('#nested_form')
         .css('left', pos.left.toFixed(0)+'px')
         .css('top', pos.top.toFixed(0)+'px');
   });
</script>
share|improve this answer

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