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I have a situation, where two classes (one deriving from the other) both implement the same interface explicitly:

interface I
{
  int M();
}
class A : I
{
  int I.M() { return 1; }
}
class B : A, I
{
  int I.M() { return 2; }
}

From the derived class' implementation of I.M(), I'd like to call the implementation of the base class, but I don't see how to do it. What I tried so far is this (in class B):

int I.M() { return (base as I).M() + 2; }
// this gives a compile-time error
//error CS0175: Use of keyword 'base' is not valid in this context

int I.M() { return ((this as A) as I).M() + 2; }
// this results in an endless loop, since it calls B's implementation

Is there a way to do this, without having to implement another (non interface-explicit) helper method?


Update:

I know it's possible with a "helper" method which can be called by the derived class, e.g:

class A : I
{
    int I.M() { return M2(); }
    protected int M2 { return 1; }
}

I can also change it to implement the interface non-explicitly. But I was just wondering if it's possible without any of these workarounds.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, it isn't possible.
Not even with a helper method. The helper method has the same problems as your second attempt: this is of type B, even in the base class and will call the implementation of M in B:

interface I
{
  int M();
}
class A : I
{
  int I.M() { return 1; }
  protected int CallM() { return (this as I).M(); }
}
class B : A, I
{
  int I.M() { return CallM(); }
}

The only workaround would be a helper method in A that is used in A's implementation of M:

interface I
{
  int M();
}
class A : I
{
  int I.M() { return CallM(); }
  protected int CallM() { return 1; }
}
class B : A, I
{
  int I.M() { return CallM(); }
}

But you would need to provide a method like this also for B if there will be a class C : B, I...

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Yes that workaround is what I have added to the updated question. But it's not what I wanted to know. –  M4N May 12 '11 at 10:06
1  
@M4N: That is just to make the answer a bit bigger ;-) The real answer is the first sentence: It is impossible without such workarounds. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 12 '11 at 10:07
4  
To add to why it's impossible: Explicitly implemented interface methods are made private - making them impossible to call from a derived class. You should probably prefer a different method like the one Daniel listed anyway, to avoid the call super code smell. –  Mark H May 12 '11 at 10:18
    
Thanks for explaining why it is impossible, I understand now. –  Amedio May 12 '11 at 10:43
    
@DanielHilgarth Thanks for the post, this saved me some time. –  Etch Oct 3 '12 at 15:11

It is possible using reflection.
The code follows. I added caching as a basic optimization, but it can be optimized further by using Delegate.CreateDelegate on methodInfo. Also, parameter count and type checks can be added using methodInfo.GetParameters().

interface I   
{   
    int M();   
} 

class A : I   
{   
    int I.M() { return 1; }   
} 

class B : A, I   
{   
    BaseClassExplicitInterfaceInvoker<B> invoker = new BaseClassExplicitInterfaceInvoker<B>();
    int I.M() { return invoker.Invoke<int>(this, "M") + 2; }   
}

public class BaseClassExplicitInterfaceInvoker<T>
{
    private Dictionary<string, MethodInfo> cache = new Dictionary<string, MethodInfo>();
    private Type baseType = typeof(T).BaseType;

    private MethodInfo FindMethod(string methodName)
    {
        MethodInfo method = null;
        if (!cache.TryGetValue(methodName, out method))
        {
            var methods = baseType.GetMethods(BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly);

            foreach (var methodInfo in methods)
            {
                if (methodInfo.IsFinal && methodInfo.IsPrivate) //explicit interface implementation
                {
                    if (methodInfo.Name == methodName || methodInfo.Name.EndsWith("." + methodName))
                    {
                        method = methodInfo;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }   

            cache.Add(methodName, method);
        }

        return method;
    }

    public RT Invoke<RT>(T obj, string methodName)
    {            
        MethodInfo method = FindMethod(methodName);
        return (RT)method.Invoke(obj, null);
    }

}   //public static class BaseClassExplicitInterfaceInvoker<T>

Here is the source of my inspiration.

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Works like a charm. Reflection is the way to go in this case. –  Kees C. Bakker Feb 1 '13 at 12:02
1  
Just because you can do something it does not mean that you have to do it. –  Unknown Mar 25 '13 at 12:34
1  
Just because you should probably consider not doing something does not mean there aren't instances where doing it is indispensable ;-) @Roland, thanks for sharing, works a treat! –  Dav May 21 '14 at 22:58

it is necessary explicitly?... Can you use an abstract class or class instead of interface?

interface ISample {}
class A : ISample {}
class B : A {}
...
base.fun();
...

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hfw7t1ce(v=vs.71).aspx

I have no idea its not possible call base method when it comes from implementation of interface.

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No! B has a different implementation of the interface than A (it adds something to A's implementation). –  M4N May 12 '11 at 9:56
    
@M4N - Then you can only extend A override the method and make a base call to the method and continue implementing the method. –  Amedio May 12 '11 at 10:00
    
See updated question. (explicit implementation is not necessary, but I was just wondering whether it's possible) –  M4N May 12 '11 at 10:03

You can't call Explicit interface method in base class,here i solved this issue

I have two interface -> Interface1 and Interface2

public interface Interface1
{      
    string method2();      
}

public interface Interface2
{   
    string method22();

}

Main class Method

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        class1 cls = new class1();
        string str = cls.method2();
    }
}

and my interface implemented class

class class1 : Interface1, Interface2
{

    #region Interface1 Members

    public string method2()
    {
        return (this as Interface2).method22();
    }      

    #endregion

    #region Interface2 Members      

    string Interface2.method22()
    {
        return "2";
    }

    #endregion
}
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