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I'm creating a nested hash in ruby rexml and want to update the hash when i enter a loop.

My code is like:

hash = {}
doc.elements.each(//address) do |n|
  a = # ... 
  b = # ...
  hash = { "NAME" => { a => { "ADDRESS" => b } } }
end

When I execute the above code the hash gets overwritten and I get only the info in the last iteration of the loop.

I don't want to use the following way as it makes my code verbose

hash["NAME"] = {}
hash["NAME"][a] = {} 

and so on...

So could someone help me out on how to make this work...

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4 Answers 4

Assuming the names are unique:

hash.merge!({"NAME" => { a => { "ADDRESS" => b } } })
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hey thank u very much for ur quick reply.. if i execute the above code its still overwritten.. the variables a and b are alone unique but the "NAME" and "ADDRESS" are different.. so what do i do in this case.. –  sundar May 12 '11 at 10:29

You always create a new hash in each iteration, which gets saved in hash.

Just assign the key directly in the existing hash:

hash["NAME"] = { a => { "ADDRESS" => b } }
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hey thanks for ur reply.. In the above code if i have more nested keys like hash["NAME"] = { a => { "ADDRESS" => b , "PLACE" => { "COUNTRY" => d, "REGION" => e } } then the code again becomes lengthy.. –  sundar May 12 '11 at 10:43
hash = {"NAME" => {}}

doc.elements.each('//address') do |n|
  a = ...
  b = ...
  hash['NAME'][a] = {'ADDRESS' => b, 'PLACE' => ...}
end
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hi if i have more nested keys then the code becomes too lengthy.. –  sundar May 12 '11 at 11:00
    
What makes it lengthier than your original non-working code? –  Mladen Jablanović May 12 '11 at 14:46
blk = proc { |hash, key| hash[key] = Hash.new(&blk) }

hash = Hash.new(&blk)

doc.elements.each('//address').each do |n|
  a = # ...
  b = # ...
  hash["NAME"][a]["ADDRESS"] = b
end

Basically creates a lazily instantiated infinitely recurring hash of hashes.

EDIT: Just thought of something that could work, this is only tested with a couple of very simple hashes so may have some problems.

class Hash
  def can_recursively_merge? other
    Hash === other
  end

  def recursive_merge! other
    other.each do |key, value|
      if self.include? key and self[key].can_recursively_merge? value
        self[key].recursive_merge! value
      else
        self[key] = value
      end
    end
    self
  end
end

Then use hash.recursive_merge! { "NAME" => { a => { "ADDRESS" => b } } } in your code block.

This simply recursively merges a heirachy of hashes, and any other types if you define the recursive_merge! and can_recusively_merge? methods on them.

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hey this works fine but i want to create the hash in this manner: hash = { "NAME" => { a => { "ADDRESS" => b } } } but this is not updating the hash when entering the loop. –  sundar May 13 '11 at 8:20

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