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I have some troubles when I am trying to read from stdin. What I want to do is to read unknown lines from stdin until character '.' is introduced. Could you help me with some examples?

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4  
What's the trouble you're having? – Artefacto May 12 '11 at 10:18
2  
What do you want to happen when the line has an embedded '.', like "Go. Now!"? – pmg May 12 '11 at 10:31
    
Thank you for the answers , but DipSwitch's answer it's all i wanted! – Vlasin May 12 '11 at 10:42
    
@pmg Sounds like he's making an STMP listener. Single dot line marks end of data. – Mel May 12 '11 at 11:36
    
So a line with "...." gets "translated" as "..." and should not terminate the procedure, right? @Vlasin? ??? – pmg May 12 '11 at 11:39

Don't read lines ... read characters.

int ch;
while (1) {
    ch = getchar();
    if ((ch == EOF) || (ch == '.')) break;
    /* deal with ch */
}
if (ch == '.') {
    /* '.' detected */
}
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You could use something like this. There are more efficient ways but this would be fine to make a start.

#define BUFFER_SIZE 1024

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    // declare buffer
    char str[BUFFER_SIZE];

    // read till .
    int idx = 0;
    register int cr;
    do {
          if ((cr = getchar()) == '.' || cr == 0 || cr == EOF)
              break;

          str[idx] = cr;
    } while(++idx != BUFFER_SIZE);

    if (idx != BUFFER_SIZE)
    {
        str[idx] = 0; // 0 terminate string replacing . by end of string
        printf("%s", str); // print the string
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Buffer overflow");
    }

    exit(0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
no check for EOF? – pmg May 12 '11 at 10:29
    
Other ways can be something like read(STDIN_FILENO, str, BUFFER_SIZE); and then parse the buffer. – DipSwitch May 12 '11 at 10:29
    
Good point, updated :) – DipSwitch May 12 '11 at 10:32
    
Thank you for your answer. It really helped me ! – Vlasin May 12 '11 at 10:38
1  
taking into account that a getchar() would use a syscall read and the syscall read only uses 4 register there would be 2 more free registers and on an x64 system even 10 so I think yes (on a linux system atleased) :) – DipSwitch May 12 '11 at 11:41

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