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To get C.run() to use its own class logger, should I add a public/protected method getLogger() in B?

public abstract class A extends Thread {
    @Override
    public abstract void run();
}

public class B extends A {

    private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(B.class.getName());

    @Override
    protected void run() {
        // do something

        logger.info("B");
    }
}

public class C extends B {
}
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What is the output you are getting? Have you tried? –  MarvinLabs May 12 '11 at 10:49
    
@Nicklas: Weclome to StackOverflow! –  jmendeth May 12 '11 at 10:52
    
Why do you need subclasses to use it's own loggers? –  Dmitry Stropaloff May 12 '11 at 10:53
    
Each of the subclasses of A will be executed by a task engine. Some classes (like C in my example) extends another task. If C does not override B.run() I have no way to force it to use its own logger. Unless I add a getLogger() method. –  Nicklas May 12 '11 at 11:04
    
But if C doesn't override B.run() then what is C doing? Presumably it has methods which are called, which you can log to its own logger. If you really want to (and are sure it's a good idea) to always log to the B,C Logger instance depending on which is the concrete implementation you could have the Logger getLogger() method which polymorphically returns the lowest Logger in the hierarchy. –  planetjones May 12 '11 at 11:10

2 Answers 2

Well the Loggers are ideally set at Class level. So if C needs it own Logger then declare its own Logger in C e.g.

private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(C.class.getName());

This way when C runs some code it logs to its own Logger and when B runs it logs to its own Logger. You'll be able to clearly see which Class logs what this way.

If this isn't what you're after please expand the question with what you're trying to achieve and why.

I'm not convinced if the following code is a good idea (I always want the Class which is physically running the code to be the Logger) but it should work:

public abstract class A extends Thread {
    @Override
    public abstract void run();
    protected abstract Logger getLogger();
}

public class B extends A {

    private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(B.class.getName());

    @Override
    public void run() {
        getLogger().info("B");
    }

    @Override
    protected Logger getLogger() {return logger;);  
}

public class C extends B {

    private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(C.class.getName());

    @Override
    protected Logger getLogger() {return logger;);  
}
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Your modification of my example was exactly how I saw a possible solution. –  Nicklas May 12 '11 at 11:17
    
Yep if that's what you're after - that's about the only way I can see it happening (reinstated now - I'd missed the curly braces... DOH!) –  planetjones May 12 '11 at 11:19

You may use this in base class:

protected Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(this.getClass().getName());

this.getClass() will initialize the logger with subclass name.

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2  
I guess this issue with making it non-static is that each instance of the Object will make this call. I know it will return the existing logger, but it's still extra code executing in the java.util.Logger class to look it up for each new instance. –  planetjones May 12 '11 at 11:00
    
Yep, but I don't see any solution without drawbacks here. Anyway, if each new subclass requires to define a new logger in specified style - there is a problem with design, imho. –  StKiller May 12 '11 at 11:03
    
Well I guess it depends what your design objective is - if you're happy with a Class hierarchy logging to the same logger then just declare it at the top of the tree and allow all subclasses to log to it. If you want to log for each class then give each subclass its own Logger. I've always gone for the each subclass has its own logger approach. –  planetjones May 12 '11 at 11:05
    
I would delete the "If you will use non-abstract base class" as you can use that in an abstract base class. Also the use of this is unnecessary as you can just use getClass(). –  Jason S May 12 '11 at 11:46
    
@Jason S - I don't use "this" to specify the subclass. It's used just for more readable code. Thank you for suggestion about "non-abstract". –  StKiller May 12 '11 at 12:26

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