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If there is a POD structure, with some member variables, for example like this :

struct foo
{
   short a;
   int b;
   char c[50];
   // ...
};

Is there a way to get the size of a member variable in bytes, without creating object of this type?

I know that this will work :

foo fooObj;
std::cout << sizeof( fooObj.a ) << std::endl;
std::cout << sizeof( fooObj.b ) << std::endl;
std::cout << sizeof( fooObj.c ) << std::endl;

EDIT
Would the following be optimized by the compiler and prevent the construction of an object?

std::cout << sizeof( foo().a ) << std::endl;
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Unless they are static, I don't think so... –  Gal May 12 '11 at 10:52
    
What's the exact requirement? Why can't you use the compile-time information? In my understanding, C++ doesn't dynamic class generation and manipulation –  sarat May 12 '11 at 10:56

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

5.3.3/1:

The sizeof operator yields the number of bytes in the object representation of its operand. The operand is either an expression, which is not evaluated, or a parenthesized type-id.

The above means the following construct is well defined:

sizeof( ((foo *) 0)->a);
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4  
@Martin: But he writes a macro, you would say "Way too much work and it hides the actual meaning." :P –  Nawaz May 12 '11 at 11:43
2  
@Nawaz: But based on the standard above. The OP's original comments holds, sizeof(foo().a) is valid, well defined, the object is not constructed, is not ugly and does not require the extra work of a potentially misleading macro. –  Loki Astari May 12 '11 at 12:12
1  
@Martin: What? foo() doesn't construct object, even be it anonymous object? –  Nawaz May 12 '11 at 12:18
1  
@Nawaz: No, not in this case, the operand to sizeof isn't evaluated. –  Erik May 12 '11 at 12:19
1  
@Erik: Awesome. How come I missed that. –  Nawaz May 12 '11 at 12:22

You can do that in C++0x:

sizeof(foo::a);
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1  
+1 for short and sweet reply :-) –  mag May 23 '11 at 9:59

Use this form: sizeof(foo::a) instead.

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1  
This would not work : ideone.com/8D5Dh –  Nawaz May 12 '11 at 11:07
4  
This would work: ideone.com/STfsy –  Bo Persson May 12 '11 at 11:22

What is wrong with the obvious:

sizeof( foo::a )

And in response to your edit, in C++ sizeof is ALWAYS evaluated at compile time, so there is no runtime cost whatsoever.

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4  
That wouldn't work since a is not a static member. –  Nawaz May 12 '11 at 10:58
1  
This works :) it just references the member inside the class definition. –  Constantinius May 12 '11 at 11:00
1  
@Nawaz Eh? What has static got to do with it? –  nbt May 12 '11 at 11:01
    
@unapersson: You're accessing a which is non-static member of foo. –  Nawaz May 12 '11 at 11:02
1  
@Nawaz And so.... what is your point? –  nbt May 12 '11 at 11:03
struct foo
{
   short a;
   int b;
   char c[50];
   // ...
   static const int size_a = sizeof(a);
   static const int size_b = sizeof(b);
   static const int size_c = sizeof(c);
};

Usage:

foo::size_a
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This would work, but would be PITA, because that would require adding 10 additional static variables –  BЈовић May 12 '11 at 11:01
1  
sizeof does not yield int, it yields std::size_t. –  ildjarn May 12 '11 at 19:28

You can create macro wrapper of what @Erik suggested as:

#define SIZE_OF_MEMBER(cls, member) sizeof( ((cls*)0)->member )

And then use it as:

cout << SIZE_OF_MEMBER(foo, c) << endl;

Output:

50

Demo : http://www.ideone.com/ZRiMe

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Way too much work and it hides the actual meaning. At least give the macro a name that explains what it is doing. –  Loki Astari May 12 '11 at 11:40
    
@Martin: I didn't find any compelling name for the macro. Suggest me one. :-) –  Nawaz May 12 '11 at 11:42
    
SIZE_OF_MEMBER, That's what she said. –  Loki Astari May 12 '11 at 11:43
    
@Martin: Cool. Done! –  Nawaz May 12 '11 at 11:45
    
Still way to much work. But at least the name stands out now. –  Loki Astari May 12 '11 at 12:02

C++-0x allows you to do this:

  std::cout << sizeof( foo::a ) << std::endl;
  std::cout << sizeof( foo::b ) << std::endl;
  std::cout << sizeof( foo::c ) << std::endl;

C++-0x allows sizeof to work on members of classes without an explicit object.

The paper is here: Extending sizeof to apply to non-static data members without an object (revision 1)

I saw the post about this above too late. Sorry.

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