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I'm doing a C++ quiz and I need to say whats wrong in the following code:

class Base {
    friend class SubClass;
    int n;
    virtual int getN()
    {
        return n;
    }
};

class SubClass: public Base {
public:
    SubClass() {}
    SubClass(const SubClass& s) {}
};

int main()
{
    SubClass sc;
    if(sc.getN() <= 5)
    {
        int x = sc.getN();
    }
    return 0;
}

Besides that n is uninitilized and maybe the object should be created through a Base class pointer, what else could be wrong?
When I run it I get this error:

 error: 'virtual int Base::getN()' is private
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2  
Even considering it's a quiz question, the main mistake in this piece of code is it's completley pointless. –  Codo May 12 '11 at 11:59
    
@Codo: why do you say this ? –  vBx May 12 '11 at 12:02
1  
Try it the other way around: What is the point of this piece of code? It neither does anything defined nor does it represent any valuable concept. –  LumpN May 12 '11 at 12:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

As by default every member of a class1 is private, getN in the base class is declared private.

Make getN public as:

class Base {
    friend class SubClass;
    int n;
public: //<--------------------- you forgot this
    virtual int getN()
    {
        return n;
    }
};

1. I mean, a class defined with the keyword class. Note that class can be defined with the keyword struct and union as well, according to the C++ Standard.


EDIT:

If you think because SubClass is a friend of Base, so it can access private members of Base from outside, then that is wrong. friend means member functions of SubClass can access private members of Base class.

However, if you make main() friend of Base, then your code would work:

 class Base {
        friend int main(); //make main() friend of Base
        //...
    };

Now from main(), any private members of Base can be accessed!

See this demo : http://www.ideone.com/UKkCF

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2  
+1 Succinct and correct. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 12 '11 at 11:54
    
So that is the problem, getN() should be public. But I am confuse about this, if SubCLass is a friend of Base doesnt he has acces to private members ? –  vBx May 12 '11 at 11:55
    
Or is acceseble only in the derived class, not main , i guess –  vBx May 12 '11 at 11:56
    
OK, thanks for explaining this. –  vBx May 12 '11 at 12:01
1  
@Nawaz: yes its completly logical that if SubClass its a friend of base, only SubClass can acces private memebers, no one else, stupid mistake from me :) –  vBx May 12 '11 at 12:06

Your compiler should give you some clues...

% g++ -Wall -Wextra -Wshadow -Weffc++ test.cpp
test.cpp:1: warning: ‘class Base’ has virtual functions but non-virtual destructor
test.cpp:10: warning: ‘class SubClass’ has virtual functions but non-virtual destructor
test.cpp: In constructor ‘Base::Base()’:
test.cpp:1: warning: ‘Base::n’ should be initialized in the member initialization list
test.cpp: In constructor ‘SubClass::SubClass()’:
test.cpp:12: note: synthesized method ‘Base::Base()’ first required here 
test.cpp: In copy constructor ‘SubClass::SubClass(const SubClass&)’:
test.cpp:13: warning: base class ‘class Base’ should be explicitly initialized in the copy constructor
test.cpp: At global scope:
test.cpp:13: warning: unused parameter ‘s’
test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
test.cpp:4: error: ‘virtual int Base::getN()’ is private
test.cpp:19: error: within this context
test.cpp:4: error: ‘virtual int Base::getN()’ is private
test.cpp:21: error: within this context
test.cpp:21: warning: unused variable ‘x’
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There's actually so much wrong conceptually with this code that even those compiler messages won't cover everything. For example: Why is SubClass a friend? –  LumpN May 12 '11 at 11:58
    
Your compiler maybe...my compiler only gives the last 2, i use MinGW –  vBx May 12 '11 at 11:59
    
@LumpN: its a quiz, doesnt a quiz supposed to be like this ? :) –  vBx May 12 '11 at 12:00
    
@LumpN: I only said clues, not answers. This is a [homework] question after all. @vBx: Try turning up your warning levels to get more feedback. –  Johnsyweb May 12 '11 at 12:37

The error message says it all: getN is implicitly private, which is the default for classes in C++.

Use

class Base {
 // ...

public:
   virtual int getN();
};

to make it a publicly accessible member. The facts that SubClass is a friend of Base and that getN is called through an instance of Subclass don't matter here - getN is simply not accessible from within main(), where it is called from. You could make main a friend of Base, however.

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Thanks, I understand now. –  vBx May 12 '11 at 11:57

the function

virtual int getN() { /*...*/ }

is private(by default) within your Base class. Since it's not overloaded within you SubClass, it stays private when you call it within your main function.

If you want to make it legal, make it public within the class:

public:
    virtual int getN() { /*...*/ }
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Oh, i didint know this, thanks :) –  vBx May 12 '11 at 11:57
class Base {
    friend class SubClass;
    int n;
public:
    virtual int getN()
    {
        return n;
    }
};

class members are private as default

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