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I have the following test:

[Test]
public void VerifyThat_WhenHasInterceptorIsCalledWithAComponentModelThatHasTheLogAttribute_TheReturnValueIsTrue()
{
    // Arrange
    Mock<ComponentModel> mock = /* ... */;
    LoggingInterceptorsSelector selector = new LoggingInterceptorsSelector();
    // Act & Assert togheter
    Assert.That(selector.HasInterceptors(mock.Object), Is.True);
}

Is there something wrong with unifying the Act & Assert?
What should be done to remedy this issue if it is wrong?
EDIT:
What about this kind of test:

[Test]
[Category("HasInterceptors() Tests")]
public void VerifyThat_WhenHasInterceptorsIsCalledWithANullComponentModel_AnArgumentNullExceptionIsThrown()
{
    LoggingModelInterceptorsSelector selector = new LoggingModelInterceptorsSelector();

    Assert.That(new TestDelegate(() => selector.HasInterceptors(null)), Throws.TypeOf<ArgumentNullException>());
}

The act and assert must be on the same line in order to assert it correctly. At least that's what I understand from it.

What about this one:

[Test]
[Category("HasInterceptors() Tests")]
public void VerifyThat_WhenHasInterceptorsIsCalledWithANullComponentModel_AnArgumentNullExceptionIsThrown()
{
    LoggingModelInterceptorsSelector selector = new LoggingModelInterceptorsSelector();
    var testDelegate = new TestDelegate(() => selector.HasInterceptors(null));
    Assert.That(testDelegate, Throws.TypeOf<ArgumentNullException>());
}

Does this adhere to the AAA pattern better?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should not unify the act and assert.

The point of the pattern is to easily discern the different parts - so it is very easy to tell where you are arranging the test, then what method is being called in act and finally, what you are asserting on.

Mixing act and assert muddies this, not to say, for those used to AAA it would take them by surprise (where is the act?).


Update (following edit of post):

Most test frameworks allow you to specify an expected exception (nUnit and MSTest use an ExpectedExceptionAttribute) in the test method (that's your assert). You still should act separately.

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So what should be done? See edit for more details. –  the_drow May 12 '11 at 12:26
    
but the ExpectedExceptionAttribute causes the Assert stage of the test to disappear from the flow (or appear first if you consider the attribute part of the flow). –  the_drow May 12 '11 at 12:46
    
@the_drow - but the clarity and separation are kept. This is the drive of AAA. Clarity and separation, so you don't lose anything. And people are used to exceptions to be tested this way. –  Oded May 12 '11 at 12:52
    
See third edit for more code. –  the_drow May 12 '11 at 12:56
    
@the_drow - I like the third approach better. Not a bad way to do this, though the syntax may obscure the meaning a bit. –  Oded May 12 '11 at 13:04

I would do:

[Test]
public void VerifyThat_WhenHasInterceptorIsCalledWithAComponentModelThatHasTheLogAttribute_TheReturnValueIsTrue()
{
    // Arrange
    Mock<ComponentModel> mock = /* ... */;
    LoggingInterceptorsSelector selector = new LoggingInterceptorsSelector();

    // Act 
    var result = selector.HasInterceptors(mock.Object);

    // Assert 
    Assert.That(result, Is.True);
}

AAA and easy to read.

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