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So here's what I'm trying to do.

I'm creating a generic class that allocates the type specified by the generic parameter in one of two ways, determined by which overloaded constructor is used.

Here is the example:

class MyClass<T>
    where T : class
{
    public delegate T Allocator();
    public MyClass()
    {
        obj = new T();
    }

    public MyClass( Allocator alloc )
    {
        obj = alloc();
    }

    T obj;
}

This class requires that type T is a reftype in all cases. For the default constructor, we want to instantiate T via its default constructor. I'd like to put a where T : new() on my default constructor, like this:

public MyClass()
    where T : new()
{
    obj = new T();
}

However, this is not valid C#. Basically I only want to add the constraint on type T to have a default constructor only when the default constructor of MyClass() is used.

In the second constructor for MyClass, we let the user determine how to allocate for T with their own allocation method, so obviously it makes sense for MyClass to not enforce T be default constructible in all cases.

I have a feeling that I'll need to use reflection in the default constructor for this, but I hope not.

I know this can be done because the Lazy<T> class in .NET 4.0 does not require T to be default constructible at the class level, yet it has constructors similar to those in my example. I'd like to know how Lazy<T> does it at least.

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can only include constraints in the declaration where you're introducing a generic type parameter.

However, you could introduce a generic method on a non-generic type:

public class MyClass
{
    public static MyClass<T> Create<T>() where T : class, new()
    {
        return new MyClass<T>(() => new T());
    }
}

public class MyClass<T> where T : class
{
    T obj;

    public MyClass(Allocator allocator)
    {
        obj = allocator();
    }
}

(I'd personally just use Func<T> instead of declaring a separate delegate type btw.)

Then you can use:

MyClass<Foo> foo = MyClass.Create<Foo>(); // Enforces the constraint
share|improve this answer
    
Changing my answer to this one... I did some reading on Activator.CreateInstance<T>() and indeed it doesn't do the check for default construction at compile time (which I prefer). I went with the generic factory class instead. – void.pointer May 12 '11 at 13:44
    
How can you define MyClass twice without using the 'partial' keyword? I'm not familiar with this syntax. – void.pointer May 13 '11 at 14:36
1  
@Robert Dailey: I haven't declared MyClass twice - I've declared MyClass (non-generic) and MyClass<T> (generic with one type parameter). They're separate types, just as Nullable and Nullable<T> are separate types. – Jon Skeet May 13 '11 at 14:41

Basically I only want to add the constraint on type T to have a default constructor only when the default constructor of MyClass() is used.

It is not possible to enforce this with a constraint on T. You either have it be the case that where T : new() is specified in the definition of MyClass<T> or you do without such a constraint at all.

I have a feeling that I'll need to use reflection in the default constructor for this, but I hope not.

You can't enforce the constraint, but you can say

obj = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();

which will invoke the default constructor for T.

I know this can be done because the Lazy class in .NET 4.0 does not require T to be default constructible at the class level, yet it has constructors similar to those in my example. I'd like to know how Lazy does it at least.

Lazy<T> requires you specify a delegate that returns instances T. Basically, it requires you to specify a Func<T>.

share|improve this answer
    
You can enforce the constraint - just not in the constructor. Introducing it in a generic method elsewhere works fine. – Jon Skeet May 12 '11 at 13:28
    
@Jon Skeet: The constraint the OP is requiring can not be enforced on the type parameter T that is defined by the generic class MyClass<T>. – jason May 12 '11 at 17:29
    
Not on the type itself, no... but you can create a simple generic method on a non-generic type, and use that instead of a public parameterless constructor - see my answer. The point - as I understand it - is to provide a simple but compile-time-safe way of creating an instance of MyClass using the parameterless constructor for T. My answer does that. – Jon Skeet May 12 '11 at 17:41

You can try to use Activator

class MyClass<T> where T : class
{
    public MyClass()
    {
        obj = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
also: Activator.CreateInstance<T>() – Marc Gravell May 12 '11 at 13:23
    
That leaves the checking to execution time, which isn't ideal IMO. – Jon Skeet May 12 '11 at 13:24
    
Activator.CreateInstance<T>() only checks if it is default constructible at runtime? – void.pointer May 12 '11 at 13:37

Well, you need to either have the constraint or not. It turns out that Lazy uses Activator to create an instance. Here is how Lazy<T> works removed code in case of copyright issues.

share|improve this answer
2  
I am not sure the license of the .NET BCL code allows for posting it on the internet... – Daniel Hilgarth May 12 '11 at 13:23
    
Noted. Lock me up and throw away the key! – Josh M. May 12 '11 at 13:25
    
What kind of a response is that? – Daniel Hilgarth May 12 '11 at 13:26
    
+1 Daniel... The Microsoft Reference License allows you to view it if you have signed the agreement... Which most on here have not. – Darbio May 12 '11 at 13:28
    
Calm down, I've removed it. – Josh M. May 12 '11 at 13:30

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