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I'd like to use std::tm () as the key for an std::map-container. But when I try to compile it, I get a lot(10) of errors.

For example:

1.

error C2784: 'bool std::operator <(const std::basic_string<_Elem,_Traits,_Alloc> &,const _Elem *)' : could not deduce template argument for 'const std::basic_string<_Elem,_Traits,_Alloc> &' from 'const tm' c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\xfunctional 125

2.

error C2784: 'bool std::operator <(const _Elem *,const std::basic_string<_Elem,_Traits,_Alloc> &)' : could not deduce template argument for 'const _Elem *' from 'const tm' c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\xfunctional 125

3.

error C2784: 'bool std::operator <(const std::vector<_Ty,_Ax> &,const std::vector<_Ty,_Ax> &)' : could not deduce template argument for 'const std::vector<_Ty,_Ax> &' from 'const tm' c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\xfunctional 125

Does all this mean, that I "simply" have to created an function object which compares two std::tm, because there is no standard-comparison defined for this? Or is there another trick? (or may it even be impossible to me? ^^)

Code:

#include <map>
#include <ctime>
#include <string>


int main()
{
    std::map<std::tm, std::string> mapItem;
    std::tm TM;

    mapItem[TM] = std::string("test");
    return 0;
};
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

std::map uses a comparer to check if the key already exists or not. So when you use std::tm , you've to provide a comparer as third argument as well.

template < class Key, class T, class Compare = less<Key>,
           class Allocator = allocator<pair<const Key,T> > > class map

So a solution would be functor (as you already guessed):

struct tm_comparer
{
   bool operator () (const std::tm & t1, const std::tm & t2) const
   {           //^^ note this

        //compare t1 and t2, and return true/false
   }
};

std::map<std::tm, std::string, tm_comparer> mapItem;
                             //^^^^^^^^^^ pass the comparer!

Or define a free function (operator <) as:

bool operator < (const std::tm & t1, const std::tm & t2)
{          // ^ note this. Now its less than operator

    //compare t1 and t2, and return true/false
};

std::map<std::tm, std::string> mapItem; //no need to pass any argument now!
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If I would switch to and unordered_map ,would it make this obsolete? –  Incubbus May 12 '11 at 14:12
    
@Incubbus: No. unordered_map would still need it. Because both type of map needs to check the keys. They must check for unique keys. –  Nawaz May 12 '11 at 14:15
    
pastebin.com/v1X6tai9 <- does this functor look sufficient enough, if we presume, that someone needs a few seconds to enter stuff (so tm_sec should never be the same)? –  Incubbus May 12 '11 at 14:32
    
@Incubbus: why can't tm_sec be same? 01:30:05 and 03:49:05 both has same tm_sec. What you probably can do is, convert tm into number of seconds, and compare only the second. Or if you fear that value would exceed the maximum value of the datatype (int, long long or whatever you take), then you can convert tm into number of hours, and seconds. For example, 5 days, 4 hours, 30 minutes, 7 seconds would become : (5 x 24 + 4) hours and 30 x 60 + 7 seconds. If you do so, then it would be easy to compare. –  Nawaz May 12 '11 at 15:07
    
@Incubbus: Also, you need to write constructor and destructor in the comparer functor, as the default ones generated by the compiler is enough for you. –  Nawaz May 12 '11 at 15:08

Yes std::tm doesn't define a < operator.

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A free function suffices, you do not need a function object.

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1  
You may use a free < operator but you may not supply any free function as the Compare parameter of std::map, the template definition is template <class Key, class T, class Compare = less<Key>... –  Andreas Brinck May 12 '11 at 14:36
    
@Andreas: You are correct. I mixed that up with cases like for_each, where the functor can be any callable. –  Björn Pollex May 12 '11 at 16:53
1  
Actually I was mistaken ;) See this stackoverflow.com/questions/5989010/contradiction-in-c-standard –  Andreas Brinck May 13 '11 at 8:26
    
@Andreas: Good find! Thanks for sharing. –  Björn Pollex May 13 '11 at 9:01

Yes, you need to define operator< for tm structure. see http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/stl/map/map/ for example (bottom of page).

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