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I have a replica set that I am trying to upgrade the primary to one with more memory and upgraded disk space. So I raided a couple disks together on the new primary, rsync'd the data from a secondary and added it to the replica set. After checking out the rs.status(), I noticed that all the secondaries are at about 12 hours behind the primary. So when I try to force the new server to the primary spot it won't work, because it is not up to date.

This seems like a big issue, because in case the primary fails, we are at least 12 hours and some almost 48 hours behind.

The oplogs all overlap and the oplogsize is fairly large. The only thing that I can figure is I am performing a lot of writes/reads on the primary, which could keep the server in lock, not allowing for proper catch up.

Is there a way to possibly force a secondary to catch up to the primary?

There are currently 5 Servers with last 2 are to replace 2 of the other nodes. The node with _id as 6, is to be the one to replace the primary. The node that is the furthest from the primary optime is a little over 48 hours behind.

{
"set" : "gryffindor",
"date" : ISODate("2011-05-12T19:34:57Z"),
"myState" : 2,
"members" : [
    {
        "_id" : 1,
        "name" : "10******:27018",
        "health" : 1,
        "state" : 2,
        "stateStr" : "SECONDARY",
        "uptime" : 20231,
        "optime" : {
            "t" : 1305057514000,
            "i" : 31
        },
        "optimeDate" : ISODate("2011-05-10T19:58:34Z"),
        "lastHeartbeat" : ISODate("2011-05-12T19:34:56Z")
    },
    {
        "_id" : 2,
        "name" : "10******:27018",
        "health" : 1,
        "state" : 2,
        "stateStr" : "SECONDARY",
        "uptime" : 20231,
        "optime" : {
            "t" : 1305056009000,
            "i" : 400
        },
        "optimeDate" : ISODate("2011-05-10T19:33:29Z"),
        "lastHeartbeat" : ISODate("2011-05-12T19:34:56Z")
    },
    {
        "_id" : 3,
        "name" : "10******:27018",
        "health" : 1,
        "state" : 1,
        "stateStr" : "PRIMARY",
        "uptime" : 20229,
        "optime" : {
            "t" : 1305228858000,
            "i" : 422
        },
        "optimeDate" : ISODate("2011-05-12T19:34:18Z"),
        "lastHeartbeat" : ISODate("2011-05-12T19:34:56Z")
    },
    {
        "_id" : 5,
        "name" : "10*******:27018",
        "health" : 1,
        "state" : 2,
        "stateStr" : "SECONDARY",
        "uptime" : 20231,
        "optime" : {
            "t" : 1305058009000,
            "i" : 226
        },
        "optimeDate" : ISODate("2011-05-10T20:06:49Z"),
        "lastHeartbeat" : ISODate("2011-05-12T19:34:56Z")
    },
    {
        "_id" : 6,
        "name" : "10*******:27018",
        "health" : 1,
        "state" : 2,
        "stateStr" : "SECONDARY",
        "optime" : {
            "t" : 1305050495000,
            "i" : 384
        },
        "optimeDate" : ISODate("2011-05-10T18:01:35Z"),
        "self" : true
    }
],
"ok" : 1
}
share|improve this question
    
Could you post the output of rs.status() as run from one of the secondaries? –  Rob Cowie May 12 '11 at 14:45
    
I think you would get a better answer to this question if you asked it on StackOverflow's sister site ServerFault.com –  Theo May 12 '11 at 19:42
    
Thanks, I did just that. serverfault.com/questions/269184/… –  Bryan May 12 '11 at 19:49
1  
You need to get to the root of the problem -- the secondaries cannot keep up with write activity on the primary. You need to look into bottlenecks (network, disk, server load, mongo load) to determine what is holding them back. Forcing your secondaries to resync is likely to make the situation worse as it'll put more load on an already stressed system. –  Steve Brisk May 19 at 19:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

After looking through everything I saw a single error, which led me back to a mapreduce that was run on the primary, which had this issue: https://jira.mongodb.org/browse/SERVER-2861 . So when replication was attempted it failed to sync because of a faulty/corrupt operation in the oplog.

share|improve this answer
    
That bug was fixed several years ago. Are you sure that you're running a version that old? –  Steve Brisk May 19 at 19:35
    
This is circa 2011 when 1.8.0 was the version we were running. As you can see in the JIRA issue, it was patched March 2011. Only a couple months before this question was answered. –  Bryan May 20 at 19:48
    
Sorry for bumping this, I didn't realize how old this was. SO had it listed under recent questions. –  Steve Brisk May 21 at 2:14

I'm not sure why the syncing has failed in your case, but one way to brute force a resync is to remove the data files on the replica and restart the mongod. It will initiate a resync. See http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Halted+Replication. It is likely to take quite some time, dependent on the size of your database.

share|improve this answer
    
resync does not indeed work on replica sets. also, deleting the data files and restarting aren't really the best option as it takes days to recover. This also won't solve the problem, because I had an equally spec'd server that i left to recover on it's own and it is just as "old" as the other secondaries. –  Bryan May 12 '11 at 14:33
    
@Bryan: Yeah, just tried out the resync command and realised my fail. Answer edited. As you've already allowed a replica to resync completely and it is also stale, I'm not sure what the issue is. I'll have a think. –  Rob Cowie May 12 '11 at 14:38

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