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I'm trying the following code to count the number of rows in my SQLite database table, but it throws an exception. Is these a simpler way to do this?

- (void) countRecords {
    int rows = 0;
    @try {
            NSString *dbPath = [self getDBPath];

            if (sqlite3_open([dbPath UTF8String], &database) == SQLITE_OK) {

                NSString *strSQL;
                strSQL = @"SELECT COUNT(*) FROM MYTABLE";
                const char *sql = (const char *) [strSQL UTF8String];
                sqlite3_stmt *stmt;

                if (sqlite3_prepare_v2(database, sql, -1, &stmt, NULL) == SQLITE_OK) {

                    // THIS IS WHERE IT FAILS:

                    if (SQLITE_DONE!=sqlite3_step(stmt) ) {

                        NSAssert1(0,@"Error when counting rows  %s",sqlite3_errmsg(database));

                    } else {
                        rows = sqlite3_column_int(stmt, 0);
                        NSLog(@"SQLite Rows: %i", rows);
                    }

                    sqlite3_finalize(stmt);
                }

                sqlite3_close(database);

            }

        }

        @catch (NSException * e) {
        NSLog(@"Error Counting");
        }
}
share|improve this question
    
What is the name of the table "inside" the database? – Tim May 12 '11 at 14:07
    
I'm sorry. I was vague. I meant to count rows in a table, not a database. – Lauren Quantrell May 12 '11 at 16:57
up vote 11 down vote accepted

I came across a solution, using my code above, just replacing the step statement with the code below:

if (sqlite3_step(stmt) == SQLITE_ERROR) {
    NSAssert1(0,@"Error when counting rows  %s",sqlite3_errmsg(database));
} else {
    rows = sqlite3_column_int(stmt, 0);
    NSLog(@"SQLite Rows: %i", rows);
}
share|improve this answer

This usually works for me

- (NSInteger )numberRecordsForTable:(NSString *)table {
NSInteger numTableRecords = -1;
if (sqlite3_open([self.dbPath UTF8String], &database) == SQLITE_OK) {
    NSString *sqlStatement = [NSString stringWithFormat: @"select count(*) from %@", table];
    const char *sql = [sqlStatement cStringUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
    if(sqlite3_prepare_v2(database, sql, -1, &sqlClause, NULL) == SQLITE_OK) {          
        while(sqlite3_step(sqlClause) == SQLITE_ROW) {
            numTableRecords = sqlite3_column_int(sqlClause, 0);
        }
    }
    else {
        printf("could not prepare statement: %s\n", sqlite3_errmsg(database));
    }
}
else {
    NSLog(@"Error in Opening Database File");
}
sqlite3_close(database);
return numTableRecords; 

}

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Cornish. But I found a way to do this without loping through each row, using the code I provided in my answer: if (sqlite3_step(stmt) == SQLITE_ERROR) { ... – Lauren Quantrell May 12 '11 at 17:06

There is no SQL expression to count rows in a database: you can count rows in a every table and then add them up.

share|improve this answer

I thought I'd trow in my two cents here as there is an expression to count rows in a database, I use it when dealing with MySQL databases using php scripts all the time. and I tested it in an ios app it's available in there too behold:

sqlite3 *database;
if(sqlite3_open([dbpath UTF8String], &database) == SQLITE_OK)
{
    NSString *sql = @"select count(*) from today";
    sqlite3_stmt *selectStatement;
    int returnValue = sqlite3_prepare_v2(database, [sql UTF8String], -1, &selectStatement, NULL);
    if (returnValue == SQLITE_OK) 
    {
        if(sqlite3_step(selectStatement) == SQLITE_ROW)
        {
            numrows= sqlite3_column_int(selectStatement, 0);
        }
    }
    sqlite3_finalize(selectStatement);
    sqlite3_close(database);
}

no need for a fancy loop counter thing. btw if your using an auto increment int for the primary key. it works just slightly different then an array's key. where as in an array that is n items long the valid array elements are from 0 to n-1 in a database the key field is from 1 to n simple enough to work around if you just keep that in mind.

share|improve this answer

You'll have to count of each table individually. Some pseudo code:

sql = "SELECT name FROM sqlite_master" WHERE type = 'table'
tables() = GetRows(sql)

Dim total As Integer
For Each t As String in tables
  sql = "SELECT COUNT(*) FROM " + t
  total = total + GetValue(sql)
Next

Show(total)
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry. I should have been more specific. I mean to count the number of rows in a table since my DB has only one table. I'll correct my question. – Lauren Quantrell May 12 '11 at 16:56

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