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I'm using reflection to create some objects. The values I'm setting are read in from a file so they're natively in a string format and I need to convert them to the datatype of the property.

My question is, which is faster/better to use: the Convert.ToX(...) methods or the X.Parse(...) methods?

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1  
I can't tell you, but I can tell you how to find out... Open up ILDasm and open up the dll with all the classes in (takes a bit of finding) you can then see the IL code they use. It's not really readable, but you can see what it's calling and check if which on calls which. –  Matt May 12 '11 at 14:24
2  
Or just use ILSpy to see C# code instead of IL instructions... –  Daniel Hilgarth May 12 '11 at 14:25
1  
possible duplicate of The difference between convert and parse. –  Henk Holterman May 12 '11 at 15:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

All of the Convert.ToX functions that accept an argument of type string ultimately call down to the Parse method of the appropriate datatype anyway.

For example, Convert.ToInt32(string) looks something like this:

public static int ToInt32(string value)
{
   if (value == null)
   {
      return 0;
   }
   return int.Parse(value, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);
}

The same thing for all of the other numeric conversion methods, including Decimal and DateTime. So it's fairly irrelevant which one you use; the result (and speed) will be the same in either case.

Really, the only difference is the if (value == null) guard clause at the beginning. Whether or not that's convenient depends on the specific use case. Generally, if you know that you have a non-null string object, you might as well use Parse. If you're not sure, ConvertToX is a safer bet, requring less null-checking code inline.

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Good sleuthing @Cody! I'll opt to use the Convert methods since I don't have to worry checking for null. –  Micah May 12 '11 at 14:32
    
A variable being null when I don't expect it to is usually a bug. So I want to get an exception instead of a silent data corruption. So I'd say you have to worry more about null checks when using Convert than when using parse. –  CodesInChaos May 12 '11 at 14:34
    
@Code: Yeah, I agree. But there are cases where you don't have an particular expectation. It would be perfectly reasonable for the variable to both be or not be null. In that case, there's nothing wrong with Convert. –  Cody Gray May 12 '11 at 14:36
    
I still like stating which default value I want explicitly. –  CodesInChaos May 12 '11 at 14:41
    
This doesn't seem very object-oriented to me. Your classes should either have a static Parse method that returns an instance of the class, or have constructors that take other types as arguments. Using a utility class smells faintly of encapsulation violation to me (since you're putting a dependency in the Convert class that your class will always support conversion from other specified types). –  TMN May 15 '11 at 20:52

They are exactly the same! The Convert.ToX(String) methods actually call the X.Parse(String) methods.

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Another possibility is the TryParse methods. These are particularly useful if there is a possibility that the value cannot be parsed successfully. Instead of throwing an exception the call will return a bool indicating whether the operation was successful. This executes much faster and is a cleaner implementation as compared to dealing with the exception.

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According to what i see in Reflector , Convert form string is a wrapper around Parse. so it stand to reason using parse is marginally better in performance.

EDIT: after Cody pointed out that optimization will make the difference almost nothing, i tested on my machine, and indeed the execution times for Parse and Convert came out the same when parsing 1 million inetgers in a loop.

EDIT2: here you go yas4891 ,its actually the code you used with very minor changes.

public static void Main()
        {
            int tRuns = 1000000;
            List<String> tList = new List<string>();
            for (int i = 0; i < tRuns; i++) tList.Add(i.ToString());
            Stopwatch s = new Stopwatch();
            s.Start();
            int tSum = 0;
            for (int i = tRuns - 1; i >= 0; i--) 
            {
                tSum += Convert.ToInt32(tList[i]);
            }
            s.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("convert: " + s.ElapsedMilliseconds);

            Console.WriteLine("tSum:" + tSum); 

            s.Reset();
            s.Start();
            tSum = 0; 
            for (int i = tRuns - 1; i >= 0; i--) 
            { 
                tSum += Int32.Parse(tList[i]); 
            } 
            s.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("parse: " + s.ElapsedMilliseconds);
            Console.WriteLine("tSum:" + tSum);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
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The first part is more or less correct. But why does your conclusion "stand to reason"? That indicates to me that they're the same thing, not that one is "better", even marginally so. –  Cody Gray May 12 '11 at 14:34
    
@Cody Gray you are correct i was not clear here, updated the answer –  Menahem May 12 '11 at 14:36
    
That's not really correct, either. I assumed that's where you were going, but once the JIT compiler gets through with the code, it's highly unlikely that there'll be any perceptible performance difference between the two methods. –  Cody Gray May 12 '11 at 14:37
    
since theres the null check and extra function call, there must be a difference. its as you say not perceptible, but its there, and in a tight loop might even amount to something. thats why i said marginal. does this make sense? –  Menahem May 12 '11 at 14:41
1  
You're doing that thing programmers do where they assume things instead of testing them, or better yet, just resisting the temptation to prematurely optimize things. The entire method qualifies for inlining, it's extremely unlikely that even a million iterations will show a noticeable performance difference based on a single if statement. –  Cody Gray May 12 '11 at 14:42

using the following code

int tRuns = 1000000;
List<String> tList = new List<string>();

for (int i = 0; i < tRuns; i++)
   tList.Add(i.ToString());


PerformanceMeter.Start();
int tSum = 0;
for (int i = tRuns-1; i >= 0; i--)
{
   tSum += Convert.ToInt32(tList[i]);
}

PerformanceMeter.LogAndStop("using Convert.ToInt32:");

cLogger.Info("tSum:" + tSum);
PerformanceMeter.Start();

tSum = 0;
for (int i = tRuns-1; i >= 0; i--)
{
   tSum += Int32.Parse(tList[i]);
}

PerformanceMeter.LogAndStop("using Int32.Parse:");
cLogger.Info("tSum:" + tSum);

gives me the following output:

{ PerformanceMeter}:178 INFO: - using Convert.ToInt32:: 233,0133 ms
{ Program}: 92 INFO: - tSum:1783293664
{ PerformanceMeter}:178 INFO: - using Int32.Parse:: 179,0103 ms
{ Program}:102 INFO: - tSum:1783293664

So at least for Int32 it seems to be more efficient to use Int32.Parse. However this may be different in your scenario and I suppose you should do a similiar test.

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Erm, you didn't seriously try to test the performance of something when compiled in "Debug" mode with optimizations disabled, did you? That's a completely meaningless test. Good thing I'm out of votes for the day, this is an easy -1. –  Cody Gray May 12 '11 at 14:44
    
@Cody: Just because I used debug outputs for this quick example ? Just so you understand: I did this quick test in one of my programs that is set to 'Release' and I use log4net DEBUG outputs even in my releases –  yas4891 May 12 '11 at 14:53
    
Yes. The bold parts of my comment are important. Debug mode disables all code optimizations, including but not limited to the JIT compiler. The result is meaningless data that lines up with your intuitions, but doesn't hold up once optimizations are applied. Doing performance tests with debug code shows a fundamental misunderstanding of the purposes for each. –  Cody Gray May 12 '11 at 14:55
    
I know that the bold parts are important. I know that testing without optimization is meaningless. However you confuse log4net DEBUG with actual compilation –  yas4891 May 12 '11 at 14:58
1  
Looping over 100 million (yes, 100 million) times, I can't get more than 5 milliseconds difference between the two methods. Compiled with optimizations enabled, running outside of VS without the debugger attached. Talk about insignificant. I'm still suspicious of your perf tests. –  Cody Gray May 12 '11 at 15:13

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