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Dear all, I am a new user of matlab on a project about dynamic system. I have two equations, in which T0, epsilon (E), a are fixed. I want to see the phage diagram when the b and c is choosen in the range in (0, 4) and (0, 100), respectively. In the graph, region I represent the unstable limit cycle while the region II the monostable and the region II the bistable region.

In fact, I think that I may be able to draw the graph by firstly arbitrarily choosing a point in b, c phage and then calculating corresponding values of x1 and x2 which enables the left part of the ODEs equals to zero. Then calculate the jacobian matrix of the right part to determine whether the egenvalue of the matrix. If it is greater than zero, then the system is unstable.

The result should be like the graph below.

But I really don't know how to determine the point on the demarcating line of the graph. Please offer your useful suggestions. Thanks in advance.

P.S: T0 = 0.1, epsilon = 0.1 a = 0.1 0 <= b <= 4.0; 0 <= c <= 100;

PP.S: The graph and equations is an excerpt from the http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2527901/ (part two: landscape and flux of biochemical oscillation network)

equation one

equation two

phage diagram

My current solution should be the following, but I cannot cat J. %Condition:

%(1) F1 = F2 = 0 (2) Jacobian = 0

%Aim:

%Obtain a non-linear equation for b and c;

a = 0.1; epslion = 0.1; T0 = 5.0;

%use the symbolic calcution

syms x y b c

F = [((epslion ^ 2 + x ^ 2 ) / ( 1 + x ^ 2) ) / (1 + y) - a * x; b / T0 - y / ( T0 * (1 + c * x ^ 2) )]; V = [x, y];

%calculate the jacobian matrix

J = jacobian(F, V);

%the symbolic solution of ODE:

%write the equation separately

S1 = dsolve ('Dx = ((epslion ^ 2 + x ^ 2 ) / ( 1 + x ^ 2) ) / (1 + y) - a * x'); S2 = dsolve ('Dy = b / T0 - y / ( T0 * (1 + c * x ^ 2) )');

BC_cal = [J(1) J(2) S1 S2]; %%%wrong, cannot join S1, because S1 = solve(sum)*, not be calculated?*

fsolve(BC_cal);

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1 Answer 1

that's a tough question and I guess you need to make a decision on how to solve it (brute force vs finesse): either strictly numerically or algebraically + numerically. For the former, Matlab will do fine, the latter requires some skills with ode's.

I don't think looking at the jacobian is the way to go, although I could be wrong. Here are a couple of my ideas:

Case 1: use the ode solver in matlab with an expanded vector input: [x1 dx1/dt x2 dx2/dt] and vary b and c in for(or parfor) loops. Stability for the variables occur when dx1/dt or dx2/dt -> 0 as t ->oo. See the second solution of this question to figure out how to do it. Eventually, you'll have a good approximation of your solution, but you'll be stuck with a lot of data.

Case 2: rewrite both equations to only have one (x1 or x2) variable per equation. It's not too hard but the resulting differential equations will be ugly like hell. You can then try and solve those equation with numerical methods (I suspect mathematica should be able to do this), and thus determine how a,b and c directly influence your solution

btw I think the proper term is phase diagram

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%Condition: %(1) F1 = F2 = 0 (2) Jacobian = 0 %Aim: %Obtain a non-linear equation for b and c; a = 0.1; epslion = 0.1; T0 = 5.0; %use the symbolic calcution syms x y b c F = [((epslion ^ 2 + x ^ 2 ) / ( 1 + x ^ 2) ) / (1 + y) - a * x; b / T0 - y / ( T0 * (1 + c * x ^ 2) )]; V = [x, y]; %calculate the jacobian matrix J = jacobian(F, V); %the symbolic solution of ODE: %write the equation separately S1 = dsolve ('Dx = ((epslion ^ 2 + x ^ 2 ) / ( 1 + x ^ 2) ) / (1 + y) - a * x'); S2 = dsolve ('Dy = b / T0 - y / ( T0 * (1 + c * x ^ 2) )'); BC_cal = [J(1) J(2) S1 S2]; fsolve(BC_cal); –  Caesar May 14 '11 at 2:56
    
Thanks for your suggestion, but they are relatively hard for me as a new learner. But I think that: under the conditions: the jacobian = 0 and the original ODEs = 0, then calculate the nonlinear equations, I could obtain a equation describing the points on the figure. –  Caesar May 14 '11 at 2:59

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