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In C++ I can have multiple forward declaration of functions like:

void Func (int);
void Func (int);   // another forward declaration, compiles fine
void Func (int) {} // function definition, compiles fine

And yet VC++ 2010 complains when I do the same for member functions (whether or not I include a definition):

class Test {
   void Func (int);
   void Func (int);   // error C2535 here
   void Func (int) {} // error here too
   };

I couldn't find anything online about multiple member function forward declarations, whether its legal, illegal, VC++ specific, ect... Is there a way around this? Is it illegal?

Now why would I want to do that? No project in particular, was just playing around with different ways to register functions. In other projects I've had to register functions/classes and used less hack-ish but more tedious methods, and was just trying (for fun) different methods using macros/templates.

Any ideas or thoughts? Specifically on the above question, but also on registering functions/classes.

Thanks in advance for your time ;)

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You're indeed declaring member functions but you are defining the class, so one could say it actually makes sense. –  ereOn May 12 '11 at 15:26
    
As @Bo Persson correctly stated, there's no need for forward declarations of member functions (within a class), since there's no "forward" inside a class: from all contexts that matter the entire class is always visible in its entirety. –  AndreyT May 12 '11 at 15:32
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3 Answers 3

You can't have multiple declarations of a member function inside a class. Your code violates 9.3/2 of the C++ Standard which says

Except for member function definitions that appear outside of a class definition, and except for explicit specializations of member functions of class templates and member function templates (14.7) appearing outside of the class definition, a member function shall not be redeclared.

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Thank-you for the quick answer ;) –  Kaisha May 12 '11 at 15:35
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There is no need to forward declare member functions. They are visible in the whole class anyway.

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1  
That's not the question, though. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 12 '11 at 15:30
1  
@Tomalak - So the answer is that the language doesn't allow it because it is not needed? :-) –  Bo Persson May 12 '11 at 15:32
    
@BoPersson: So it seems. I explore that notion in slightly greater detail in my answer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 12 '11 at 15:33
2  
Note that the last statement ("They are visible in the whole class anyway") is not true. You cannot say struct A { B<&A::f> a; void f(); };, but if you exchange the order of a and f, you can (with B being suitably declared template). I know the intent of your answer seems to say that struct A { void f() { g(); } void g() { f(); } }; is valid, but I suspect using a formulation like @AndreyT does may be more clearer ("from all contexts that matter"). –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 12 '11 at 15:40
    
@Johannes - Ok, maybe I meant "They are visible to other functions in the whole class anyway." :-) –  Bo Persson May 12 '11 at 15:43
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As Mark B says, declaring free functions and declaring member functions is treated differently.

Free function declarations can be scattered all around the place, and it would be limiting to require that only one matching declaration be present in a program.

However, you can only define a class in one big chunk of class definition1, so all its member declarations are found in one place. They can't be scattered about your program; consequently, there's no reason for the standard to allow you to write multiple member declarations... so it doesn't:

Except for member function definitions that appear outside of a class definition, and except for explicit specializations of member functions of class templates and member function templates (14.7) appearing outside of the class definition, a member function shall not be redeclared. [9.3/2]


  1. Sure, you can include that class definition multiple times in a program, but it must match exactly so, for the purposes of this discussion, it might as well just be a single definition.
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