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I'm a novice web programmer so please forgive me if some of my "jargon" is not correct. I've got a project using ASP.NET using the MVC3 framework.

I am working on an admin view where the admin will modify a list of equipment. One of the functions is an "update" button that I want to use jquery to dynamically edit the entry on the webpage after sending a post to the MVC controller.

I presume this approach is "safe" in a single admin setting where there is minimal concern of the webpage getting out of sync with the database.

I've created a view that is strongly typed and was hoping to pass the model data to the MVC control using an AJAX post.

In the following post, I found something that is similar to what I am looking at doing: JQuery Ajax and ASP.NET MVC3 causing null parameters

I will use the code sample from the above post.

Model:

public class AddressInfo 
{
    public string Address1 { get; set; }
    public string Address2 { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string State { get; set; }
    public string ZipCode { get; set; }
    public string Country { get; set; }
}

Controller:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View();
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Check(AddressInfo addressInfo)
    {
        return Json(new { success = true });
    }
}

script in View:

<script type="text/javascript">
var ai = {
    Address1: "423 Judy Road",
    Address2: "1001",
    City: "New York",
    State: "NY",
    ZipCode: "10301",
    Country: "USA"
};

$.ajax({
    url: '/home/check',
    type: 'POST',
    data: JSON.stringify(ai),
    contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
    success: function (data.success) {
        alert(data);
    },
    error: function () {
        alert("error");
    }
});
</script>

I have not had a chance to use the above yet. But I was wondering if this was the "best" method to pass the model data back to the MVC control using AJAX?

Should I be concerned about exposing the model information?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 36 down vote accepted

You can skip the var declaration and the stringify. Otherwise, that will work just fine.

$.ajax({
    url: '/home/check',
    type: 'POST',
    data: {
        Address1: "423 Judy Road",
        Address2: "1001",
        City: "New York",
        State: "NY",
        ZipCode: "10301",
        Country: "USA"
    },
    contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
    success: function (data) {
        alert(data.success);
    },
    error: function () {
        alert("error");
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out the slight adjustment. Is there any concern with exposing the model structure from a security standpoint? –  John Stone May 12 '11 at 18:28
    
Nothing glaring stands out as a security issue to me. If you're really concerned about it though, you can always make a custom model binder on the mvc side. –  Craig M May 12 '11 at 18:31

I found 3 ways to implement this:

C# class:

public class AddressInfo {
    public string Address1 { get; set; }
    public string Address2 { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string State { get; set; }
    public string ZipCode { get; set; }
    public string Country { get; set; }
}

Action:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Check(AddressInfo addressInfo)
{
    return Json(new { success = true });
}

JavaScript you can do it three ways:

1) Query String:

$.ajax({
    url: '/en/Home/Check',
    data: $('#form').serialize(),
    type: 'POST',
});

Data here is a string.

"Address1=blah&Address2=blah&City=blah&State=blah&ZipCode=blah&Country=blah"

2) Object Array:

$.ajax({
    url: '/en/Home/Check',
    data: $('#form').serializeArray(),
    type: 'POST',
});

Data here is an array of key/value pairs :

=[{name: 'Address1', value: 'blah'}, {name: 'Address2', value: 'blah'}, {name: 'City', value: 'blah'}, {name: 'State', value: 'blah'}, {name: 'ZipCode', value: 'blah'}, {name: 'Country', value: 'blah'}]

3) JSON:

$.ajax({
      url: '/en/Home/Check',
      data: JSON.stringify({ addressInfo: 
          Address1: $('#address1').val(),
          Address2: $('#address2').val(),
          City: $('#City').val(),
          State: $('#State').val(),
          ZipCode: $('#ZipCode').val()}),
      type: 'POST',
      contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8'
});

Data here is a serialized JSON string. Note that the name has to match the parameter name in the server!!

='{"addressInfo":{"Address1":"blah","Address2":"blah","City":"blah","State":"blah", "ZipCode", "blah", "Country", "blah"}}'
share|improve this answer
4  
+1 for option #2. That is really slick! –  Landon Poch Oct 15 '12 at 3:08
2  
+1 for many options. –  DarthVader Dec 7 '12 at 23:17
2  
+1 Nice Answer. –  SSS Mar 2 '13 at 8:12
    
Just came across this great, thorough answer which solved questions I didn't know I had yet. +1, thanks! –  SeanKilleen Jul 21 '13 at 3:04
    
#2 was what I was looking for. This should be the answer. –  SemiDemented Jul 30 '13 at 10:07

This is the way it worked for me:

$.post("/Controller/Action", $("#form").serialize(), function(json) {       
        // handle response
}, "json");

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult TV(MyModel id)
{
    return Json(new { success = true });
}
share|improve this answer

what you have is fine - however to save some typing, you can simply use for your data


data: $('#formId').serialize()

see http://www.ryancoughlin.com/2009/05/04/how-to-use-jquery-to-serialize-ajax-forms/ for details, the syntax is pretty basic.

share|improve this answer
    
In order to use the serialize function, my understanding is that each member of the class needs to be used in a form object. If that is correct, I may be SOL. –  John Stone May 12 '11 at 18:31
1  
ah ya.. if not you cant use serialize then. you can always manipulate the DOM though and create a form with those elements and serialize it - but... it would likely be cleaner to just have the fields manually typed out then. –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT May 12 '11 at 18:59
    
this does not work in IE –  Taha Rehman Siddiqui Oct 23 '13 at 7:59
    
@TahaRehmanSiddiqui serialize indeed works in IE, what doesn't work? Do you get an error? –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Oct 27 '13 at 0:26
    
every property of my model is coming out null –  Taha Rehman Siddiqui Oct 27 '13 at 7:26

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