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I'm building a program in which an eye tracking device causes an LED to flash. The aim is for the LED to flash briefly when the eyes are looking directly at it (as detected by the eye tracker). The LED will be in a fixed position and the eye tracker returns co-ordinates of eye position which I will use to determine when the angle of gaze is correct.

The LED is connected to a relay switch which is connected through the RS-232 COM1 serial port. This part of the program works absolutely fine. All that is required for the LED to flash is for the port to be initialised and uninitialised (as a side-note, if anyone can think of a more efficient way of achieving this than initialising and uninitialising each time I want the LED to flash, I'd like to know it).

Anyway, my LED flash program is as follows:

#include <windows.h>

//Initialise Windows module
int WINAPI WinMain (HINSTANCE hThisInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance,
LPSTR lpszArgument, int nFunsterStil)

{
 //Define the serial port precedure    
 HANDLE hSerial;

 //Fire the flash (First line opens port, second line closes)
     hSerial = CreateFile("COM1",GENERIC_WRITE, 0, 0, OPEN_EXISTING,
 FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL, 0);
 CloseHandle(hSerial);

 return 0;
}

Anyhoo, the next step is to drop my little program into the eyetracker's SDK. I'm currently working with an example program which is vastly complicated (at least to myself, I've only started learning C++ for the purpose of this project).

The program I intend on dropping the code into is a Windows based program, but it does not include the windows.h header file. The code (main.c) starts as follows:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "gcwindow.h"
#include <sdl_text_support.h>
#ifdef WIN32
#include <w32_dialogs.h>
#endif

//<THE REST OF THE PROGRAM>

I have tried to simply drop my code after this (simply as a test to see if the code is compatible), which does cause the LED to flash, but then the program fails to continue on to what it used to do, i.e. the program doesn't seem to want to continue if there is a Windows procedure in place.

Just to clarify, this is the start of main.c, after I have dropped my code into it:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "gcwindow.h"
#include <sdl_text_support.h>
#ifdef WIN32
#include <w32_dialogs.h>
#endif

//Added the Windows module to allow LED control
#include <windows.h>

//Initialise Windows module
int WINAPI WinMain (HINSTANCE hThisInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance,
LPSTR lpszArgument, int nFunsterStil)

{
    //Define the serial port procedure
    HANDLE hSerial;

//Fire the LED
    hSerial = CreateFile("COM1",GENERIC_WRITE, 0, 0, OPEN_EXISTING,
    FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL, 0); CloseHandle(hSerial);
}

//<THE REST OF THE PROGRAM AS IT USED TO BE GOES HERE...>

Why does the program hang after my LED has flashed? I notice that I am dumping C++ code into a C program, but the code all works if it is run separately.

Any help gratefully received.

share|improve this question
    
Do you have a main(...) and a WinMain(...) at the same time?! –  Skurmedel May 12 '11 at 16:10
    
Yes! Well, I have a WinMain(...) and an app_main(...). I'll look into that. –  CaptainProg May 12 '11 at 16:12
    
OK. Problem with this is, both the WinMain and app_main pass arguments. Do I NEED to have a WinMain for the program to work? I've tried changing 'WinMain' to 'flash' and adding the line 'flash();' to the code where I want the LED to flash (somewhere within app_main)... But I am told not enough arguments are passed. What values should I pass to the 'flash()' function to retain normal function? –  CaptainProg May 12 '11 at 16:18
    
Solved it - needed to just pass (1,1,1,1) to the WinMain. Are these the ideal arguments to pass? –  CaptainProg May 12 '11 at 16:22
1  
If you can guarantee they'll never be used I guess, but why bother with a WinMain in that case?? You can run the same write-to-file code from the usual main(). Correct values, in case they're ever used, would be WinMain(GetModuleHandle(NULL), NULL, GetCommandLine(), SW_HIDE); –  Rup May 12 '11 at 16:56

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