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Why this works:

 Object prova = 9.2;
 System.out.println(prova);
 Double prova2 = (Double) prova;
 System.out.println(prova2);

And this doesn't?

Object prova = 9.2;
System.out.println(prova);
Float prova2 = (Float) prova;
System.out.println(prova2);

I lost 1 hour in my javaa android application caause of this thing so i ha to cast it in a double and than the double in a flout or i had an exception

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1  
If you read the exception text from the latter (which I'm assuming is ClassCastException), and then look at the inheritance hierarchy for Float and Double, the answer should be apparent. –  Anon May 12 '11 at 16:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Because you are relying on autoboxing when you wrote

Object prova = 9.2;

If you want it to be a Float, try

Object prova = 9.2f;

Remember that java.lang.Float and java.lang.Double are sibling types; the common type is java.lang.Number

If you want to express a Number in whatever format, use the APIs, for example Number.floatValue()

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9.2 is a double literal. Try 9.2f instead.

Object prova = 9.2f; // float literal is auto-boxed to a Float
System.out.println(prova);
Float prova2 = (Float) prova; // Float can be cast to Float, while Double cannot
System.out.println(prova2);

The error message (which you probably should have included in your question) explains it quite well also:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ClassCastException: 
    java.lang.Double cannot be cast to java.lang.Float
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You can also check what is happening by adding System.out.println(prova.getClass()); –  leonbloy May 12 '11 at 16:46

Because prova is a Double, and Double is not a subtype of Float.

Either you could start with a float literal: 9.2f (in which case prova would actually be a Float) or, you could it like this:

Float prova2 = ((Double) prova).floatValue();
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It doesn't matter if Float is a subtype of Double, the cast wouldn't have worked anyway. –  jarnbjo May 12 '11 at 16:11
    
Right, got it in the wrong order. Better now? –  aioobe May 12 '11 at 16:13

Because if you don't specify, it will be a double. If you want it to be a float, you need

Object prova = 9.2F;
System.out.println(prova);
Float prova2 = (Float) prova;
System.out.println(prova2);
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