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In C# you can mark a class as internal so that it is only accessible from within the same package. Is there anything similar in Java?

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3  
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2534733/java-protected-classes –  pintxo May 12 '11 at 16:19
2  
@cmmi: Not really a duplicate, as the question is asked from an entirely different perspective. Same answer though. –  Steven Jeuris May 12 '11 at 16:21
2  
Note that C# doesn't have packages- They have namespaces and assemblies. Packages are equivalent to namespaces. But Assemblies can be compared to JAR files in Java. The internal modifier makes a class only accessible within an assembly. As such it has nothing to do with namespaces or packages. –  nedR Feb 5 '14 at 14:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 34 down vote accepted

You can create package-private classes by omitting the security modifier (public, private) from the class's declaration.

package com.sample;

class MyPackagePrivateClass
{
    ...
}
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Awesome! Thanks :) –  Svish May 12 '11 at 16:41
1  
package is way better encapsulation than assembly –  hB0 Oct 22 '13 at 18:57
5  
@hB0 : No way! How would you declare an "internal" helper class refereced in different packages? You simply cannot –  Lotfi Jan 8 '14 at 8:31
    
What I meant is "a better way of software design" not more feature intensive (which MS always comes with) –  hB0 Jan 8 '14 at 15:00
    
While I agree a package is a definition far from namespace, programming several parts of a class library which may somewhat get weird, when classes have to call each other, but you don't want them to be accessible from outside that library AND then if you want to achieve this, you can't have these classes on separate packages. Create a "Internal" package maybe, for classes used only by the own library maybe would be the safest way out. –  Felype Feb 25 at 13:58

Dropping the access modifier is similar to internal in C#.

C#

public class A
{
    public static int X;
    internal static int Y;
    private static int Z;
}
internal class B
{
    public static int X;
    internal static int Y;
    private static int Z;
    public class C
    {
        public static int X;
        internal static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
    private class D
    {
        public static int X;
        internal static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
}

Java

public class A
{
    public static int X;
    static int Y;
    private static int Z;
}
class B
{
    public static int X;
    static int Y;
    private static int Z;
    public class C
    {
        public static int X;
        static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
    private class D
    {
        public static int X;
        static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
}

Source: http://www.javacamp.org/javavscsharp/internal.html

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Yes. It's called package private, you just define the class without any modifiers:

package com.blah; class Foo{ }

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You can make a class package local. This is the default scope for a class. i.e. where you have no access modifiers.

If you really want to put sometime you can create an annotation e.g. @package_local, I do this in places where I speicifc want it to be package local and didn't just leave it unspecificed.

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Yes, the default (package private) access level. Just leave out any access modifier on your class definition and you get what you want.

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I'm not familiar with C#, but in Java the default protection is that something is only accessible within the package:

public=accessible by anyone

private=accessible only within the current class

protected=accessible within the package or in any class that inherits from the current class

default=accessible within the package

I've always thought there should be a way to say "accessible by any class that inherits from the current class but not from anywhere else, this package or any other". But there isn't.

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