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This is a hypothetical question, not based on anything I'm working on at the moment but I was wondering about it earlier and I figured I'd ask people who might know more about it than I do.

The reason I came up with the question in the first place is, I'm currently working on a web application and if, hypothetically, I would stop working on this application and some other developer would take over, I figured he'd need some documentation for the functions that I wrote so he doesn't need to go through all the code, right?

I was wondering about ways to document my code and 'best practices' (if they exist for this subject). I know Ruby has RDoc which 'generates' documentation for the files in a specific directory. Does PHP have something like this? Or would it be better to not use some generator and write the documentation from scratch? If so, what would be the best way to do this?

Also, I was confused about the API acronym. Does this just mean all the functions in some application or is there more to it? When do we speak of an API and when do we speak of uh.. a bunch of functions? Or is an API more like.. something an external program can use to communicate with my application?

I'm not even sure if something rather 'simple' like a web application needs documentation (even though I guess there are web apps that are rather complex..); I'm just a student wondering about things, I have next to none experience as far as 'real life' work/development goes.

In case of not generating the documentation, would it be best to put it into separate files or would you just comment it in your code? Should comments go at the top of, for example, a class or do you comment inside a class before every function? What exactly goes into the documentation? Things that come to mind are.. what a function 'does', which arguments it takes and why, .. I'm sure there are others?

I've never really written any 'documentation' in the 'real' sense of the word. Just messy comments; then again, I haven't really written a decent web application before. But hey, looking ahead never hurts, right?

Please enlighten me :)

Thanks!

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closed as not a real question by CanSpice, unapersson, Neal, MainMa, Robert Harvey May 12 '11 at 17:16

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What exactly are you asking here? –  nbt May 12 '11 at 16:54
    
There are a couple of PHP scripts to document files (some are used via a comandline I believe), but they all need you to add the comments aboven the functions yourself in a particular way. –  Joshua - Pendo May 12 '11 at 16:57
    
Can someone explain to me why this is not a real question. How is it off-topic to being a programmer? :| –  cabaret May 12 '11 at 17:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you are looking at generate documentation based on the source then make sure your code is properly commented so that the automated tools like phpDoc can generate them to create a proper documentation. Another things it does not matter how detailed a documentation use there are some developers who prefer to look at the code than the document. For instance I generally don't look at the documentation unless I am really stuck somewhere and I need to know why a specific method was written. In this case code commenting really helps and some other things that really help are

  1. Naming Conventions (Variables,Methods, Classes)
  2. Modular Structure (Try breakdown the code so that you don't have redundant code)
  3. Don't complicate the code more than what is required.

HTH

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Thanks. This got closed for some reason so I decided to pick the best answer out of those that I got and this one made the most sense to me, especially your little list. Thank you! –  cabaret May 12 '11 at 17:43
    
You are Welcome @cabaret –  vikramjb May 12 '11 at 23:23

I was wondering about ways to document my code and 'best practices' (if they exist for this subject). I know Ruby has RDoc which 'generates' documentation for the files in a specific directory. Does PHP have something like this? Or would it be better to not use some generator and write the documentation from scratch? If so, what would be the best way to do this?

Yes, PHP has phpdoc, which works on comments in the actual code: http://www.phpdoc.org/

Also, I was confused about the API acronym. Does this just mean all the functions in some application or is there more to it? When do we speak of an API and when do we speak of uh.. a bunch of functions? Or is an API more like.. something an external program can use to communicate with my application?

It's generally considered a combination of code used that can be re-used. Functions like communicating with Twitter, doing networking, etc. However some people can use it to refer to the codebase in general.

I'm not even sure if something rather 'simple' like a web application needs documentation (even though I guess there are web apps that are rather complex..); I'm just a student wondering about things, I have next to none experience as far as 'real life' work/development goes.

I recommend documenting as much as possible. It's a good habit to get into even for simple applications. If you ever need to go back to code you've written later, it's a lot more pleasing when you find that things are documented, rather than having to re-read a lot of the logic.

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The best way to document something is to write into 'whatever is there'. Even if it's just comments in the code. If you move to a different doc'ing system, copy&paste but write when it's fresh in your mind, not N weeks/months later when you'll review your own code and have a 'what was I thinking/drinking/smoking??' moment.

Kudos for looking forward to what someone's going to have find if you happen to leave.

I still say the first thing an aspiring software engineer should know is how to type.

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PHPDoc is sort of the same way that you do JAVAdoc:
For example:

 /**
  * Get function
  * @param string $name
  * @return object
  */
 public function __get($name){
     return $this->$name;
 }
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