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I'm a C Newb

I write lots of code in dynamic languages (javascript, python, haskell, etc.), but I'm now learning C for graduate school and I have no idea what I'm doing.

The Problem

Originally I was building all my source in one directory using a makefile, which has worked rather well. However, my project is growing and I would like to split the source into multiple directories (unit tests, utils, core, etc.). For example, my directory tree might look like the following:

.
|-- src
|   |-- foo.c
|   |-- foo.h
|   `-- main.c
`-- test
    `-- test_foo.c

test/test_foo.c uses both src/foo.c and src/foo.h. Using makefiles, what is the best/standard way to build this? Preferably, there would be one rule for building the project and one for building the tests.

Note

I know that there are other ways of doing this, including autoconf and other automatic solutions. However, I would like to understand what is happening and be able to write the makefiles from scratch despite its possible impracticality.

Any guidance or tips would be appreciated. Thanks!

[Edit]

So the three solutions given so far are as follows:

  • Place globally used header files in a parallel include directory
  • use the path in the #include satement as in #include "../src/foo.h"
  • use the -I switch to inform the compiler of include locations

So far I like the -I switch solution because it doesn't involve changing source code when directory structure changes.

share|improve this question
    
+1 for -I switch, it's most flexible way to go.By the way there is no problem to put common headers in dedicated include directory(good practice any way) and use -I to provide a path to that directory(flexibility) . –  Ilya Feb 28 '09 at 19:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For test_foo.c you simply need to tell the compiler where the header files can be found. E.g.

gcc -I../src -c test_foo.c

Then the compiler will also look into this directory to find the header files. In test_foo.c you write then:

#include "foo.h"

EDIT: To link against foo.c, actually against foo.o, you need to mention it in the object file list. I assume you have already the object files, then do after that:

gcc test_foo.o ../src/foo.o -o test
share|improve this answer
    
This will not include foo.c though right? I should just make sure I include it as a dependency for building test_foo.c? –  brad Feb 28 '09 at 16:13
    
Do you want to include foo.c literally? The this also works, i.e. #include "foo.c". If you want to link against it you have to list it in the object list. –  quinmars Feb 28 '09 at 16:23

I also rarely use the GNU autotools. Instead, I'll put a single hand-crafted makefile in the root directory.

To get all headers in the source directory, use something like this:

get_headers = $(wildcard $(1)/*.h)
headers := $(call get_headers,src)

Then, you can use the following to make the object-files in the test directory depend on these headers:

test/%.o : test/%.c $(headers)
    gcc -std=c99 -pedantic -Wall -Wextra -Werror $(flags) -Isrc -g -c -o $@ $<

As you can see, I'm no fan of built-in directives. Also note the -I switch.

Getting a list of object-files for a directory is slightly more complicated:

get_objects = $(patsubst %.c,%.o,$(wildcard $(1)/*.c))
test_objects = $(call get_objects,test)

The following rule would make the objects for your tests:

test : $(test_objects)

The test rule shouldn't just make the object files, but the executables. How to write the rule depends on the structure of your tests: Eg you could create an executable for each .c file or just a single one which tests all.

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to get the object files from the source files, you can also simply do: SRC_OBJECTS := $(SRC_FILES:.c=.o) –  dm76 Mar 4 '10 at 23:51

A common way of doing this is for header files used by a single C file to be named the same as that C file and in the same directory, and for header files used by many C files (especially those used by the whole project) to be in a directory include that is parallel to the C source directory.

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Would I be using -I to tell gcc about these files as in quinmars' answer? –  brad Feb 28 '09 at 16:14
    
You have two options. Either you use a relative path from the source file to the include file, or you don't include any path at all in the #include line and you use '-I'. Your choice. I've seen both done. –  Eddie Feb 28 '09 at 16:46

Your test file should just include the header files directly using relative paths, like this:

#include "../src/foo.h"
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