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I have a list of strings in my code;

A = ['a1', 'a2', 'a3' ...]
B = ['b1', 'b2', 'b3' ...]

and I want to print them separated by a linebreak, like this:

>a1
b1
>a2
b2
>a3
b3

I've tried:

print '>' + A + '/n' + B

But /n isn't recognized like a line break.

share|improve this question
8  
It's not a line break. Do you see the difference between \n and /n? – S.Lott May 12 '11 at 17:53
6  
@S.Lott - I'm curious, I've noticed you answer a number of simple questions with a comment instead of an answer. Why is that? – John Kugelman May 12 '11 at 18:04
1  
@John Kugelman: I'm not trying to answer. I'm trying to understand the questions. In this case, I could not understand how wrong character could even lead to confusion. The output should have been obvious. Yet -- it appears -- that the output was not obvious. How can that possibly be? How can someone miss the \n, /n distinction? I don't know. I had to ask what they thought before attempting to answer. – S.Lott May 12 '11 at 18:10
10  
@S.Lott: How can someone miss the \n, /n distinction? the answer is simple: python it's my first program language and I started about two weeks to learn it, sorry if I bother you. – Geparada May 12 '11 at 19:01
3  
@Geparada: "sorry if I bother you"? Why say that? Who was bothered? I asked a question. – S.Lott May 12 '11 at 19:25
up vote 66 down vote accepted

You have your slash backwards, it should be "\n"

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19  
I'm on the edge of my seat – joslinm May 12 '11 at 17:57
    
Backward slash = "\" , forward slash = "/". The OP has his slash forwards. – user3527975 Mar 1 at 17:51
    
@user3527975, I mean backwards in the sense of reversed from how it should be. – Winston Ewert Mar 1 at 17:52
for pair in zip(A, B):
    print ">"+'\n'.join(pair)
share|improve this answer
>>> A = ['a1', 'a2', 'a3']
>>> B = ['b1', 'b2', 'b3']

>>> for x in A:
        for i in B:
            print ">" + x + "\n" + i

Outputs:

>a1
b1
>a1
b2
>a1
b3
>a2
b1
>a2
b2
>a2
b3
>a3
b1
>a3
b2
>a3
b3

Notice that you are using /n which is not correct!

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The newline character is actually '\n'.

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