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I am using sscanf in a simple little project. However, I can't see any obvious way to find where in the input string that sscanf decided it found all of its data and stopped processing.

Is there a way to do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think %n is what you are looking for.

Example:

sscanf("123", "%d%n", &i, &count);

This will store 3 in `count'.

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That is extremely interesting. It doesn't seem to be standard though, can you point me to some documentation ? –  cnicutar May 12 '11 at 18:18
    
After some searching for sscanf n, found a reference to that... not yet tried it but thanks! –  nexekho May 12 '11 at 18:18
1  
linux.die.net/man/3/scanf It's mentioned here. –  nexekho May 12 '11 at 18:19
    
+1, deleted my answer –  cnicutar May 12 '11 at 18:21
    
This is the C Standard Library reference I use: utas.edu.au/infosys/info/documentation/C/CStdLib.html –  August Karlstrom May 12 '11 at 18:31

See "%n" format specifier in http://www.cppreference.com/wiki/io/c/sscanf

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That looks like a fairly solid reference site, not sure why I haven't stumbled upon it, thanks! –  nexekho May 12 '11 at 18:20

The return value on sscanf is the number of items that were successfully converted.

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