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I'm new to unit test. There is a method that looks like:

public Image getImage(String url) {
    Document pageSource = fecthSource(url);
    Image myImage = parseHtmlToImage(pageSource);
    return Image;
}

And I write a unit test:

@test
public void getRightPicture() {
    Image img = imageFetcher.getImage("http://www.123.com");
    assertEquals(img.sourceUrl, "http://www.123.com/456.png");
    Image img = imageFetcher.getImage("http://www.abc.com");
    assertEquals(img.sourceUrl, "http://www.abc.com/def.png");
}

But if it takes a long time to access Internet. I usually want to use a local HTML file to test this method, but test the web version sometimes.

Any suggestion?

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I know I can pass a local url as parameter of getImage, but it's a special case. For instance, maybe I need use pre-calculated data in place of a slow algorithm to test. –  Lai Yu-Hsuan May 12 '11 at 18:19

4 Answers 4

Your unit test doesn't need to verify that the internet works. You should provide some mock HTML files and point to those for the test. Since you're dealing with a URL you should be able to specify a path like "file:///path/to/test.html" in place of the web URL.

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I want, but HOW? It means that I have to make paresHtmlToImage() public? –  Lai Yu-Hsuan May 12 '11 at 18:23
    
I updated the answer, you should be able to specify a file path for the URL. –  WhiteFang34 May 12 '11 at 18:25
    
See my comment on the OP. I use the URL example for convenience –  Lai Yu-Hsuan May 12 '11 at 18:29

Short answer: dependency inversion.

Somewhat longer answer:

The problem is presumably related to what fetchSource is doing; without seeing the details this answer will have to be a a bit vaguer. I'm assuming that fetchSource calls something to actually perform the retrieval, and that the details of how this is done aren't really what you're interested in testing. I'm also assuming you meant to write "fetch" everywhere you write "fecht", but it isn't particularly important to the answer.

You want to abstract away the concrete bits of fetchSource so that you can focus on testing what is important to you (parseHtmlToImage?). There are a number of ways you can do this:

  • Construct your imageFetcher with a stub implementation of the interface through which you actually retrieve the URL, passing it in via the constructor (inverting the dependency); your stub plays the role of "the Internet" and returns a canned response.
  • If you can't create a stub implementation of the interface, introduce an adapter interface where you have a production implementation that uses the current interface that you're using for retrievals, and a stub implementation you use for your tests.

This is a pretty standard technique in writing testable code (look up the Dependency Inversion Principle).

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>passing it in via the constructor What is "it"? The URL? The object implement the stub method? (can you give me little code of example? I read the DIP on wiki, but don't know how use it in this case) –  Lai Yu-Hsuan May 12 '11 at 18:36
    
Sorry for the delay; still not used to the StackExchange UI for tracking new comments. "It" in this case would be the production implementation of the interface in the production code, and a stub implementation of the interface in the test code (the interface in this case abstracting away the details of actually fetching the URI). –  Oliver Seiler May 16 '11 at 19:40

There are two options here -

  1. A local file is certainly a quicker way of doing things; also, what you could do is create a mock object (see Mockito or Easymock for facilitating mocking) so that it can mock the fetchURL method in the class you are trying to test;

  2. During other times when you want to fetchURL from web - it becomes more than unit test at that point since you are moving away the test dependencies external. In such cases, you have to deal with side-effects, viz., network delay, availability of resources, etc. One optimization for this integration testing would be to cache the resource if multiple tests are dependent on it. That way you need not fetch across the network each time.

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I will see the libs you mentioned in 1. But I don't understand the 2. Is what you mean that I should test local version in unit testing, but test network version in integration version? –  Lai Yu-Hsuan May 12 '11 at 18:27
    
Yes - you are right. Also, if you have multiple tests testing the method that has <code>fetchURL(...)</code> I would recommend caching the result. –  kuriouscoder May 12 '11 at 18:39

To expand on the Dependency Injection answer above:

So you have:

class ImageFetcher {
    public Image getImage(String url) {
       Document pageSource = fetchSource(url);
       Image myImage = parseHtmlToImage(pageSource);
       return Image;
    }
    private Document fetchSource(String url) {
        // ... Network IO etc
    }
    private Image parseHtmlToImage(Document pageSource) {
        // Parsing logic
        // Network IO
        return image;
    }
}

The first question is "Does that all really belong to "ImageFetcher". IMO fetchSource does not. That (to me) sounds like something a different "Web Utils" class would do. I'd also move the getting of an image from ImageFetcher to the utils class.

class ImageFetcher {
    private WebUtils webUtils; 
    public ImageFetcher(webUtils webUtils) {
      this.webUtils = webUtils;
    }


    public Image getImage(String url) {
       Document pageSource = webUtils.fetchSource(url);
       Image myImage = parseHtmlToImage(pageSource);
       return Image;
    }

    private Image parseHtmlToImage(Document pageSource) {
        imageURL = // Parsing logic
        image = webUtils.fetchImage(imageURL);
        return image;
    }
}

Now Image Fetcher is primary concern is working out which image to use. It no longer needs to care about how you get that image from the network. The WebUtils can be mocked for unit tests.

@test
public void getImage_ReturnsBannerImage() {
     Image expected = // ...


     String html = "<html><img src="fred"/>...</html>"; // Keep this short and simple.
     mockedWebUtil.fetchSource(Any.String).returns(html);
     mockedWebUtil.fetchImage("fred").returns(expected);

     var subject = new ImageFetcher(mockedWebUtil);
     var actual = subject.getImage("blah");

     Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
}
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