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Is is safe to instantiate a class inside a member function of that class? For example, let's say I have class CMyClass with member function CMyClass::MemberFunc, and I want to create another instance of CMyClass inside of CMyClass::MemberFunc.

void CMyClass::MemberFunc( void )
{
    CMyClass * pMyClass = new CMyClass();
}

Is this legal/safe? I know it compiles. What I am concerned about is recursion. Will I run into a recursion error when I instantiate CMyClass the first time from the main application?

void main( void )
{
    static CMyClass * s_pMyClass = new CMyClass(); // Will this cause recursion?
}

Or, will recursion only occur only if the specific member function with the additional class instance is called?

void CMyClass::MemberFunc( void )
{
    CMyClass * pMyClass = new CMyClass();
    pMyClass->MemberFunc(); // Pretty sure this will cause a recursive loop.
}

In other words, can I safely instantiate a given class within a member function of that class, so long as I do not call that member function of the second instance of that class? Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This isn't more or less safe than instantiating any other object. Note that in your example at the bottom, the recursion is strictly based on the fact that the method calls itself; it would recurse indefinitely regardless.

In sum: you should be fine.

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A (member)function calling itself is known as recursion.

Is this legal/safe?

void CMyClass::MemberFunc( void )
{

    CMyClass * pMyClass = new CMyClass();

    delete pMyClass ;  // newly added.

}

Partially correct. Because every new operation should have a delete operation accompanied on the specific instance to return the resources back to free store. Other than memory-leak the above snippet is fine.

Or, will recursion only occur only if the specific member function with the additional class instance is called?

void CMyClass::MemberFunc( void )
{
    CMyClass * pMyClass = new CMyClass();
    pMyClass->MemberFunc(); // Pretty sure this will cause a recursive loop.
}

Yes, and after some time you should run out of memory as there is no way of destructor being called for the specific instance as CMyClass::MemberFunc is being called recursively.( assuming delete pMyClass; as the end statement in the member function )

Also, there is no need to place void in the argument list when the method don't receive any parameters. I think, it is C style.

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Correct, unless you explicitly call that member function from the second instance created, you will not cause recursion. Of course, recursion isnt always a bad thing, so long as you have some kind of base-case condition to break out.

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Or if its something silly like, creating a new instance of the class within a constructor, which would invoke the constructor and cause infinite recursion –  Dan F May 12 '11 at 22:18

No, it won't cause recursion - your compiler would flag it as an error if it did. I suspect you really want to create a static instance of your class (e.g. a singleton). Can you post a real-world use-case illustrating what you want to do?

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Why would the compiler flag recursion as an error? Its a perfectly valid programming tool. The only way it could know if it was infinitely recursive, or that it was even recursive in the first place is if it actually analyzed and tried to run the code –  Dan F May 12 '11 at 18:16
    
@Dan Classes and structs cannot be declared recursively in C++. –  nbt May 12 '11 at 18:17
    
You can't declare a class or struct within itself, but you can still instantiate one within a member function, as he has described in his examples above –  Dan F May 12 '11 at 18:18
    
And a simple real-world use-case would be a copy function, that returns a new instance of the invoked object, not just another pointer or reference to it –  Dan F May 12 '11 at 18:20
    
@Dan "You can't declare a class or struct within itself, but you can still instantiate one within a member function, as he has described in his examples above" - did I suggest differently? –  nbt May 12 '11 at 18:23

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