Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to use write.table except that I want the "output" to be a variable in-memory and not a file on disk. Basically I'm trying to get the string representation of a data.frame (with column aligned, no column headers).

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Use capture.output to grab the output of print:

df.mem=capture.output(print(df, row.names=FALSE))
df.mem

[1] "   A   B   C" " 500   1  92" "  12  13 754" "   8 938   3"
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! I don't think print always aligns columns properly, but its good to know that I can capture print(). –  SFun28 May 12 '11 at 21:41
    
@SFun28 You could capture write.table too: capture.output(write.table(head(iris), header=FALSE)). –  Marek May 13 '11 at 9:34

Instead of writing to a file, you can write to any connection.

I can do this:

x = matrix(rnorm(100), ncol = 10)

write.table(file = pipe("pbcopy"), x)

which writes the table to the clipboard.

I can then read it back in with

read.table(pipe("pbpaste"))

EDIT:

You can also round everything to a fixed number of digits then use a sep = " " in the (write.table call) like this:

x = matrix(rnorm(100), ncol = 10)

write.table(file = pipe("pbcopy"), round(x, 2), sep = "    ")

readLines(pipe("pbpaste"))

results in

 [1] "      V1    V2    V3    V4    V5    V6    V7    V8    V9   V10"
 [2] "1  -0.73  0.10 -0.47  1.02 -0.13 -0.01 -1.00 -0.19 -1.10  0.29"
 [3] "2  -0.53 -0.29  0.60  1.41  2.09 -0.49 -2.48  0.17  0.88  1.53"
 [4] "3   1.16  0.28  0.40  0.36  0.16  0.03 -0.72  0.20  1.71 -1.10"
 [5] "4   0.63 -0.85 -0.23 -0.95  0.09  0.96  0.31 -0.05  1.07 -0.09"
 [6] "5  -1.15 -0.27  0.80  0.62 -0.77 -0.54  0.18 -0.16  0.27 -0.17"
 [7] "6   1.03 -2.19  1.54 -1.36  1.00  0.35 -0.84 -0.54 -0.33 -0.92"
 [8] "7   0.12  0.49 -2.03 -0.07  0.55  0.48  0.32  0.22 -0.44 -0.56"
 [9] "8  -0.13 -0.07 -0.28 -0.49  1.56 -2.00 -0.44 -0.04 -0.26  0.77"
[10] "9  -1.23 -0.53  0.57  0.08 -0.59  0.65 -0.15  0.44 -0.67  0.00"
[11] "10 -0.60  1.07 -1.82  0.39  1.11 -1.86  0.25  0.44  0.57  0.53"
share|improve this answer
    
@Greg - on the last line, I get the following error "Error in read.table(pipe("pbpaste")) : no lines available in input". I'm on Windows, not sure if that matters. Is this the system-wide clipboard? Wouldn't other clipboard operations interfere with this? –  SFun28 May 12 '11 at 18:29
    
Actually...I'm not sure now that write.table aligns columns. It doesn't seem to –  SFun28 May 12 '11 at 18:33
    
@SFun28 - I think pipe("pbpaste") may be OS X specific. Looking at ?pipe under the "Clipboard" section, I don't see a method to do this on Windows. Are you trying to do some sort of pretty printing of a matrix? What could you do with a string representation of the matrix in memory? –  Greg May 12 '11 at 18:33
    
@Greg - Correct, i'm trying to do pretty printing, except not to console - i'm using the formatted text in a plot. Is there a way to print() to a variable instead of console (w/column separator, and remove column names/ row names)? –  SFun28 May 12 '11 at 18:36
    
You can use textConnection, too. –  Greg May 12 '11 at 18:38
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think this works. any critiques? I'm still ramping up on R.

PrettyPrintDataFrame = function( toPrint , separator = "" , align = "left" )
{        
    leftAlign = FALSE
    if ( align == "left" ) 
    {
        leftAlign = TRUE        
    }
    else if ( align == "right" )  {  }
    else
    {
        stop( "align must be 'left' or 'right'" )
    }

    result = ""
    numberOfColumns = ncol( toPrint )
    columnLenghts = array( dim = numberOfColumns )         
    for ( i in seq( 1:numberOfColumns ) )
    {
        columnLenghts[ i ] = max( nchar( toPrint[ , i ] ) )
    }

    numberOfRows = nrow( toPrint )    
    for ( row in seq( 1:numberOfRows ) )
    {   
        if ( row > 1 )
        {
            result = paste( result , "\n" , sep = "" )
        }

        for ( col in seq( 1:numberOfColumns ) )
        {
            value = toPrint[ row , col ]
            valuePadding = paste( rep( " " , columnLenghts[ col ]- nchar( value ) ) , collapse = "" , sep = "" )

            if ( leftAlign )
            {
                valuePadded = paste( value , valuePadding , sep = "" )
            }
            else
            {
                valuePadded = paste( valuePadding , value , sep = "" )
            }

            if ( col == 1 )
            {
                result = paste( result , valuePadded , sep = "" )
            }
            else            
            {
                result = paste( result , valuePadded , sep = separator )
            }

        }        
    }

    return( result )

}

test

df = data.frame( A = c( 500 , 12 , 8 ) , B = c( 1 , 13 , 938 ) , C = c( 92, 754 , 3 ) )
writeLines( PrettyPrintDataFrame( df , " | " ) )
share|improve this answer
1  
You asked for some comments on your code. Here are some suggestions. 1) Using = for assign works, but <- is preferred. 2) You are using a double use of seq - 1:numberOfRows is sufficient. 3) Your coding style is quite unlike typical R. Here is a style guide I like, but there are others: had.co.nz/stat405/resources/r-style-guide.html 4) Use ifelse instead of if{} else{} - this is more compact. –  Andrie May 12 '11 at 21:48
    
@Andrie - thanks so much! I really appreciate this advice. Good catch on #2 and #4 (#4 I just discovered from the R Inferno doc which I'm halfway through...GREAT resource). re:#1/#3 you are right...I take a number of departures from the Google style guidelines. –  SFun28 May 13 '11 at 3:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.