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Right, I've got this code:

if(argc>1){
           FILE * pFile = fopen(argv[1],"rb");
           perror("");
}else{
      FILE * pFile = fopen("hardcoded","rb");
}
if(pFile==NULL){
                puts("Unable to open source file");
                return -1;
}

However, I get this weird output:

Success
Unable to open source file

Weirdlier, if I do this:

if(argc>1){
           FILE * pFile = fopen(argv[1],"rb");
           perror("");
}else{
      FILE * pFile = fopen("hardcoded","rb");
}
FILE * pFile = fopen("hardcoded","rb");
if(pFile==NULL){
                puts("Unable to open source file");
                return -1;
}

Where hardcoded exists, it all works fine!

What the blazes does that mean?

Compiling with GCC4 on Ubuntu

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1  
dlev already figured out what's wrong with your code. You didn't show us the entire excerpt, so we had to guess a little. gcc could have helped you here. Compile with warnings enabled. A nice set of options, IMO, is gcc -Wall -pedantic. –  Heath Hunnicutt May 12 '11 at 18:23
    
@Heath Hunnicutt -- yes, those seem to be the minimum practical options –  Pete Wilson May 12 '11 at 18:38
    
@Heath: even better is adding to the gcc flags -std=c89 (or currently equivalent -ansi) or -std=c99 to prevent gnu-isms that are enabled by default (even with -pedantic) –  pmg May 12 '11 at 18:42
    
@pmg: that is a good point. (Although I prefer the gnuisms to the c99. If I had my way we could use c89 + declarations in the for-init-statement and C++ comments) –  Heath Hunnicutt May 12 '11 at 18:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm surprised your code compiles, since the you are declaring FILE *pFile scoped to the if and the else blocks. If you've declare it prior to that, then remove the FILE* text in front of the assignments in the if/else blocks.

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1  
My guess was that gcc is adding more features to let someone shoot themselves in the foot even easier. –  BMitch May 12 '11 at 18:22
3  
+1 OP must have already defined FILE *pFile at the outer scope, and not shown us that code. It appears that OP is writing FILE * every time OP assigns to pFile. –  Heath Hunnicutt May 12 '11 at 18:22
    
Huh, didn't know you couldn't declare variables within language constructs. Thanks all :) –  Hamish Milne May 12 '11 at 18:30
    
@Hamish Milne: You can declare variables within language constructs. That's what you were doing that caused the confusion. What you should know is that it's possible to hide variables by declaring other variables of the same name, and that this is almost always a bad thing to do. –  David Thornley May 12 '11 at 18:39

Don't define pFile within the if statement, you're losing scope.

FILE * pFile;
if(argc>1){
           pFile = fopen(argv[1],"rb");
           perror("");
}
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I'd bet you've got a FILE * pfile; earlier in your code that you didn't include. If it's outside all blocks, and has static storage duration, it's initialized to NULL.

When you then have FILE * pfile = fopen(... in an inner block, the two pfiles are two different things. Therefore, what's happening:

You're defining pfile in a block, and opening it fine. Then you reach the end of the block, and it's being discarded like any other variable local in a block.

You're left with the original pfile, which you never opened or assigned anything to, and that's likely to be NULL.

In the second case, you're opening a file and discarding it, and then you have a FILE * pfile in the same scope as the testing if statement, and that's the one you're testing, so it's fine.

What you need to do is define pfile only once, since additional definitions will either cause compiler errors or give you separate versions. Take all the FILE * out of your inner blocks, and just use the same pfile all the time.

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