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Consider the following char* example:

char* s = "\n";

How can this be converted into a single char that represents the new line character like so:

char c = '\n';

In addition to processing newlines I also need to be able to convert any character with an escape character preceeding it into a char. How is this possible?

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6  
char c = *s; works. The '\n' inside the string is only two characters in source form: after compiling it is a single character; the same for all other escape character. The string "fo\111\tar", after compiling, has 7 characters (the 6 visible in the source code and a null terminator). –  pmg May 12 '11 at 18:56
2  
@pmg - That's an answer not a comment post it! –  JonH May 12 '11 at 18:58
    
@pmg : JonH is right. post it –  Heisenbug May 12 '11 at 18:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

char c = *s; works.

The '\n' inside the string is only two characters in source form: after compiling it is a single character; the same for all other escape character.

The string "fo\111\tar", after compiling, has 7 characters (the 6 visible in the source code ('f', 'o', '\111', '\t', 'a', and 'r') and a null terminator).

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+1 - told you so :-p –  JonH May 12 '11 at 19:03
    
Yeah, right. Thanks @JonH :) –  pmg May 12 '11 at 19:15
    
Fantastic, thanks @pmg. –  AgileVortex May 12 '11 at 20:07

Dereference it:

char* s = "\n";
char c = *s;
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As others said, the newline is actually only one character in memory. To get a single character from a string pointer, you can access your pointer as if it is an array (assuming, of course, that there is memory allocated for the string pointed to):

char* s = "\n";
char  c = s[0];
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Do you mean something like that?

char * s = "\n";
char c = *s;
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