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simple bit of code, just prints out a list of urls I put into a text file (it was printing them with the \n char at the end of each one though - how do I get rid of the \n?):

import mechanize, fileinput

with open('F:\Python\url_list2.txt') as urls:
    content = urls.readlines()
print content

anyway, it worked printed out the list, great. Run it again and I get this message in the python shell:

<closed file 'F:\Python\url_list2.txt', mode 'r' at 0x0000000002E4E390>

What is going on? Using windows 7 x64 if that makes any difference?

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It'll be easier to debug your code if you'd post it. (Guess: you're closing the file somehow, either with close() or a with statement.) –  jtniehof May 12 '11 at 19:24
3  
Are you sure it worked once? You're not printing out the contents, you're printing the file descriptor. –  Wooble May 12 '11 at 19:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The with statement automatically closes the handle after all the statements inside it execute. If you need access to the handle afterwards:

import mechanize, fileinput

urls = open('F:\Python\url_list2.txt')
content = urls.readlines()
print content

If you want to get rid of the \n at the end of every line, use .strip():

import mechanize, fileinput

urls = open('F:\Python\url_list2.txt')
content = [x.strip() for x in urls.readlines()]
print content
share|improve this answer
    
gave the expected output, cheers! –  4rd2 May 12 '11 at 19:50
    
Great that the answer gives the expected output, but this leaves the file open and also renders the strip() list comprehension largely pointless. –  Platinum Azure May 12 '11 at 20:38
    
@Platinum Azure: 100% agreed on the lack of close(); see jimbob's answer (stackoverflow.com/questions/5983339/…) for the proper way to do this. Also, stupid typo. Thanks. (FGITW not always a good thing.) –  Lucas Jones May 12 '11 at 21:28

with only keeps the file open within the indentation block. Try:

import mechanize, fileinput

with open('F:\Python\url_list2.txt') as urls:
    content = urls.readlines()
    print urls # file still open.
print content

Basically with is syntactic sugar for a common try except finally pattern:

try:
    urls = open('F:\Python\url_list2.txt')
    # rest of indented block
finally:
    urls.close()
# stuff outside of indented block

So your code translates into:

import mechanize, fileinput
try:
    urls = open('F:\Python\url_list2.txt')
    # rest of indented block
    content = urls.readlines()
finally:
    urls.close()
# stuff outside of indented block.
print urls

So you see why you urls is reported as a closed file ... you just closed it by exiting the with indentation block. You probably want to print content to see the content you loaded into the variable from the closed urls file.

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Don't do except SomeException as e: raise e. It's redundant and affects the traceback. Either raise without any arguments (which exists specifically to avoid that problem), or just leave the except clause out (you don't need one to have a finally clause). –  delnan May 12 '11 at 21:04
    
@delnan: Thanks. I wouldn't have done that in real code; off the top of my head wasn't sure if except was needed in try - finally (e.g., I know try w/o except (or finally) alone is syntax error). –  dr jimbob May 12 '11 at 21:14

When you use with, this is what is actually happening:

with open(filepath) as f:
    # do stuff
print "YAY"
# do more stuff

The above is equivalent to saying:

f = open(filepath)
try:
    # do stuff
except:
    f.close()
finally:
    f.close()
    print "YAY"
    # do more stuff

Does this explain why you are getting that error?

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Maybe you want to be printing content instead of urls?

To remove the newlines, use rstrip.

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Try print content (urls is gone after with closes.)

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Presumably a file object you've already called close() on? Can we see your code?

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all good stuff, cheers guys (sorry there was a typo with the original post it should have been 'print content') removed the with and it's all ok now thanks –  4rd2 May 12 '11 at 19:47

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