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Hi i need to make a VectorIterator, so i need to accept a Vector with any type. I am currently trying to define the type as * like so:

var collection:Vector.<*> = new Vector<*>()

But the compiler is complaining that the type "is not a compile time constant". i know a bug exists with the Vector class where the error reporting, reports the wrong type as missing, for example:

var collection:Vector.<Sprite> = new Vector.<Sprite>()

if Sprite was not imported, the compiler would complain that it cannot find the Vector class. I wonder if this is related?

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That's a great question. Uncharted territory! –  Iain Feb 28 '09 at 19:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

So it looks like the answer is there is no way to implicitly cast a Vector of a type to valid super type. It must be performed explicitly with the global Vector.<> function.

So my actual problem was a mix of problems :)

It is correct to use Vector. as a generic reference to another Vector, but, it cannot be performed like this:

var spriteList:Vector.<Sprite> = new Vector.<Sprite>()
var genericList:Vector.<Object> = new Vector.<Object>()
genericList = spriteList // this will cause a type casting error

The assignment should be performed using the global Vector() function/cast like so:

var spriteList:Vector.<Sprite> = new Vector.<Sprite>()
var genericList:Vector.<Object> = new Vector.<Object>()
genericList = Vector.<Object>(spriteList)

It was a simple case of me not reading the documentation.

Below is some test code, I would expect the Vector. to cast implicitly to Vector.<*>.

public class VectorTest extends Sprite
{
	public function VectorTest()
	{
        // works, due to <*> being strictly the same type as the collection in VectorContainer
		var collection:Vector.<*> = new Vector.<String>() 

        // compiler complains about implicit conversion of <String> to <*>
        var collection:Vector.<String> = new Vector.<String>()
		collection.push("One")
		collection.push("Two")
		collection.push("Three")

		for each (var eachNumber:String in collection)
		{
			trace("eachNumber: " + eachNumber)
		}

		var vectorContainer:VectorContainer = new VectorContainer(collection)

		while(vectorContainer.hasNext())
		{
			trace(vectorContainer.next)	
		}
	}
}

public class VectorContainer
{
	private var _collection:Vector.<*>

	private var _index:int = 0

	public function VectorContainer(collection:Vector.<*>)
	{
		_collection = collection
	}

	public function hasNext():Boolean
	{
		return _index < _collection.length
	}

	public function get next():*
	{
		return _collection[_index++]
	}
}
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Here's the iterator constructor VectorIterator(collection:Vector.<Object>) and here is how the creation looks: var spriteList:Vector.<Sprite> = new Vector.<Sprite>() var iterator:VectorIterator = new VectorIterator(Vector.<Object>(spriteList)) pretty ugly :) –  Brian Heylin Mar 1 '09 at 11:00
    
Does this mean there's no way to retain the typing? I.e. have a VectorIterator.<Sprite> or VectorIterator.<Vector.<Sprite>>... –  bzlm Mar 1 '09 at 14:05
    
yep, as far as I know. Generics are not a part of the ECMA language spec, so there is no way for me to define a class with a generic type. I can use the Vector class, but that is more of a compiler level hack as far as I can tell. –  Brian Heylin Mar 1 '09 at 16:08
    
@Brian - Vectors are supported natively by the AVM. I've not looked at how they are defined but how they are referenced is definitely unique. See my self-answered question - stackoverflow.com/questions/553445/… –  Richard Szalay Mar 2 '09 at 8:37
    
Thanks Richard, it's interesting to see how Vectors were implemented, hopefully Generics will become part of the language soon, along with a decent Proxy system for as3mock, make mocking a hell of a lot easier for you :D –  Brian Heylin Mar 2 '09 at 13:51
[Bindable]
public var selectedItems:Vector.<Category>;

public function selectionChange(items:Vector.<Object>):void
{
    selectedItems = Vector.<Category>(items);
}
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I believe you can refer to an untyped Vector by just calling it Vector (no .<>)

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That is illegal syntax according to the compiler. it at least expects Vector.<*>() –  Brian Heylin Mar 3 '09 at 8:45

With Apache Flex 4.11.0, you can already do what you want. It might have been there since 4.9.0, but I have not tried that before.

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var collection:Vector.<Object> = new Vector.<Object>()

maybe? But i'm just speculating, haven't tried it.

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This causes a type casting error. If i create a Vector.<Sprite> and pass it to my Iterator, the compiler complains about casting a Vector.<String> to a Vector.<Object>. –  Brian Heylin Mar 1 '09 at 10:10
    
Just a hunch - try declaring the method as accepting a Vector (with no type parameters) –  Richard Szalay Mar 2 '09 at 8:39
    
That is illegal syntax according to the compiler. it at least expects Vector.<*>() –  Brian Heylin Mar 3 '09 at 8:53
var collection:Vector.<Object> = new Vector.<Object>()

but only on targeting flash player 10 cs4

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This causes a type casting error. If i create a Vector.<Sprite> and pass it to my Iterator, the compiler complains about casting a Vector.<String> to a Vector.<Object> –  Brian Heylin Mar 1 '09 at 10:17

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