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I have used this example code from technet to count records in an MDB file. After converting the tables in the access database to link to SQL (using ODBC), the program no longer works. Is there an easy way to modify this code so it can still obtain record counts by querying the MDB file?

The odd thing is, you can open the MDB file and view the data as normal, it just pulls it from SQL. Why can't this code do the same when querying the mdb?

using System;
using System.Data;
using System.Data.OleDb;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

public class MainClass {
    public static void Main ()
    {
        string strAccessConn = 
                    "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;DataSource=BugTypes.MDB";
        string strAccessSelect = "SELECT * FROM Categories";
        DataSet myDataSet = new DataSet();
        OleDbConnection myAccessConn = null;
        try
        {
            myAccessConn = new OleDbConnection(strAccessConn);
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(
                "Error: Failed to create a database connection. \n{0}", 
                ex.Message);
            return;
        }

        try
        {                
            OleDbCommand myAccessCommand = 
                                new OleDbCommand(strAccessSelect,myAccessConn);
            OleDbDataAdapter myDataAdapter = 
                                new OleDbDataAdapter(myAccessCommand);

            myAccessConn.Open();
            myDataAdapter.Fill(myDataSet,"Categories");

        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(
              "Error: Failed to retrieve the required data from the DataBase.\n{0}",
              ex.Message);
            return;
        }
        finally
        {
            myAccessConn.Close();
        }
        DataTableCollection dta = myDataSet.Tables;
        foreach (DataTable dt in dta)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Found data table {0}", dt.TableName);
        }
        Console.WriteLine("{0} tables in data set", myDataSet.Tables.Count);
        Console.WriteLine("{0} tables in data set", dta.Count);
        Console.WriteLine("{0} rows in Categories table",
                            myDataSet.Tables["Categories"].Rows.Count);
        Console.WriteLine("{0} columns in Categories table",
                            myDataSet.Tables["Categories"].Columns.Count);
        DataColumnCollection drc = myDataSet.Tables["Categories"].Columns;
        int i = 0;
        foreach (DataColumn dc in drc)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Column name[{0}] is {1}, of type {2}", i++,
                                dc.ColumnName, dc.DataType);
        }
        DataRowCollection dra = myDataSet.Tables["Categories"].Rows;
        foreach (DataRow dr in dra)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("CategoryName[{0}] is {1}", dr[0], dr[1]);
        }          
    }
}

code found here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa288452(v=vs.71).aspx

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1  
If you have an external C# application and SQL Server, why on earth would you want to use Access as a middle-man with linked tables? Just query the SQL Server's database. –  HardCode May 12 '11 at 21:01
    
Could be a phased upgrade, planning to continue the linked version while the direct gets written.... –  RolandTumble May 12 '11 at 21:31
    
I'm a bit behind the times & not really familiar with C# & OleDB, but in the VB(A) world one of the differences between DAO & ADO is that a DAO RecordSet knows how many rows it has up front, but an ADO RecordSet only finds that out once it's gone to the end. There's probably something similar going on here. –  RolandTumble May 12 '11 at 21:36
    
Er, @RolandTumble, a DAO recordset does not know how many records are in it until you do a .MoveLast command (the original Rushmore technology in action). The usual approach to this problem is not to use the table's .RecordCount property (which is always accurate for Jet/ACE tables, but not for linked tables of any kind), but to instead do SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Table. –  David-W-Fenton May 13 '11 at 21:18
    
oh, yeah.... Brain fart. Must've been the local/linked difference I was thinking of. In any case, the bottom line is "Don't depend on the RecordCount property for tables outside of Access." –  RolandTumble May 13 '11 at 22:46

2 Answers 2

Wouldn't it be easier to do a

Select count('x') as rowCount from categories

and then pull rowCount from the first (and only) record in the data set.

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1  
While this will work in all cases, it's not nearly as efficient as using a Jet/ACE table's RecordCount property. If you've got multiple types of tables, local and linked, some Jet/ACE, some other kinds, you can really leverage that to speed things up. I'd use the RecordCount property for any Jet/ACE local table or linked table, and a SELECT COUNT(*) for any other table. –  David-W-Fenton May 13 '11 at 21:24

You say it no longer works and imply it's an issue with counts, but which part isn't working?

Does Rows.Count has 0 but the Rows in the datatables are there? Or are there no tables in the dataset or what?

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