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I can't understand why this works:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(){
     signed long int count = 1;

     //...

     count++;

     return 0;
}

And yet if I move the identifier declaration (limit) to the start of the script (just after the using namespace), it fails to compile with the error "count undeclared (first use in this function)" - highlighting the line 'count++;'.

Alternatively, Codepad results in the following error:

In function 'int main()':
Line 16: error: reference to 'count' is ambiguous
compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors.

Thanks,

Will.

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An I can't understand why you posted so much code that's unnecessary to reproduce the error. –  Beta May 12 '11 at 22:11
2  
Please show us what doesn't work, instead of what does work. –  Greg Hewgill May 12 '11 at 22:14
    
@Greg: I agree. Wasting my time checking code that works grrr :D –  ralphtheninja May 12 '11 at 22:15
    
What you're saying is that after you move up the declarations, the compiler has no problem with curNum but breaks on count++. I'm not buying it. –  Matt Phillips May 12 '11 at 22:18
1  
@Matt Phillips : The algorithm header could be getting included via iostream on his platform, which would definitely cause an error, but not the one he showed. –  ildjarn May 12 '11 at 22:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You probably have a collision between your count variable and std::count. You should not use using namespace std as this places everything from the standard library into the global namespace and names will soon collide.

Use specific using lines such as using std::cin; instead.

share|improve this answer
    
@Shiroko Ah, OK, thanks, although 'count' is the only variable named as such in the script. I think it's something up with my compiler. That was a good tip, anyway, so thanks! –  Will Manson May 12 '11 at 22:21
    
That would only happen if he included the header file <algorithm> that declared std::count. Otherwise there shouldn't be a collision. –  Jason May 12 '11 at 22:21
    
Depends on implementation, on my gcc-osx it seems <iostream> includes stl_algo.h. That's why some of the guys didn't succeed in recreating. –  Shiroko May 12 '11 at 22:22
    
@Jason : Standard library headers can include each other, too. Apparently on his platform iostream includes algorithm, directly or indirectly. –  ildjarn May 12 '11 at 22:23
1  
You could also, if you don't want to constantly have to declare std:: in front of all the STL functions just use ::count++. That will fetch count from the local namespace (i.e., your .cpp file), and avoid calling std::count. –  Jason May 12 '11 at 22:25

Try using ::limit, ::count, or ::curNum

This says they are declared globally. Although, you should avoid declaring any variables globally and pass by reference instead.

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It's impossible that the compiler takes a declaration of a variable like a function. Check if you write the variable declaration in the correct way.

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This compiled and ran just fine for me:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

signed long int limit;
signed long int count = 1;
signed long int curNum = 3;

// Declaration of checkprime() function
bool checkprime(signed long int x)
{
    return true;
}

int main(){
     cin >> limit;

     do{
          if(checkprime(curNum) == true){
               count++;
          }
          curNum += 2;
     } while(count < limit);

     return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
same here as well ... –  Jason May 12 '11 at 22:19
    
That produced an error for me (Dev-C++ 4.9.9.2). Must be something up with my compiler. Thanks anyway! –  Will Manson May 12 '11 at 22:19
    
@Will Manson : It's not your compiler, it's your using directive. Shiroko's answer has it right. –  ildjarn May 12 '11 at 22:25

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