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I'm currently trying to set up nginx + uWSGI server for my Django homepage. Some tutorials advice me to create specific UNIX users for certain daemons. Like nginx user for nginx daemon and so on. As I'm new to Linux administration, I thought just to create second user for running all the processes (nginx, uWSGI etc.), but it turned out that I need some --system users for that.

Main question is what users would you set up for nginx + uWSGI server and how to work with them? Say, I have server with freshly installed Debian Squeeze.

Should I install all the packages, virtual environment and set up all the directories as root user and then create system ones to run the scripts?

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I'd recommend sticking with Debian-provided packages as much as you can, unless there are specific features in newer versions that you need. The packages will handle user creation for you, which is one more reason why they're so nice to use. :) –  sarnold May 13 '11 at 2:03
    
Yes, it does, but I think I should not run my own scripts under root, right? You mean, it is okay to have only root user and system ones? Is it okay for security? –  creitve May 13 '11 at 2:10
    
@Alexander, it depends what the script should do :) you're absolutely right that your web site shouldn't run as root. Hopefully the Debian nginx package creates an nginx account and configures it to change to that user at startup... –  sarnold May 13 '11 at 2:13
    
@sarnold i'll repeat previous edit just to clarify: is it okay to have only root user and system ones? I don't need any regular users then? –  creitve May 13 '11 at 2:16
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@Alex, aha :) I like having regular users on a system: (a) multiple admins show up in sudo logs (b) not all tasks require admin privileges, but admin-level mistakes can be more costly to repair. But you're right, you can do all your work as root and not bother with regular user accounts. –  sarnold May 13 '11 at 2:30

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I like having regular users on a system:

  • multiple admins show up in sudo logs -- there's nothing quite like asking a specific person why they made a specific change.

  • not all tasks require admin privileges, but admin-level mistakes can be more costly to repair

  • it is easier to manage the ~/.ssh/authorized_keys if each file contains only keys from a specific user -- if you get four or five different users in the file, it's harder to manage. Small point :) but it is so easy to write cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh user@remotehost "cat - > ~/.ssh/authorized_keys" -- if one must use >> instead, it's precarious. :)

But you're right, you can do all your work as root and not bother with regular user accounts.

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He is asking regarding the user accounts under which the separate processes run (nginx, uwsgi), not regarding the administrator's account –  Yoav Weiss Apr 26 '12 at 11:15
    
@yeeeev: I think he was asking a different question; see this clarifying comment, is it okay to have only root user and system ones? I don't need any regular users then? –  sarnold Apr 26 '12 at 22:50

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