Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm developing a calendar app. It stores times in two formats. The table have following columns title, startDate, startTime. If the user provides start time plus start date. The database stores UNIX time stamp(number of seconds since UNIX epok) in the column startTime, while startDate is NULL. If the user only provide a start date, the database stores the date in format nnnn-mm-dd in startDate and NULL in ´startTime`. I have this DB structure, because it's easier to display times around the world, because different timezones have different daylight saving times.

I want select the events that are occurring after a specified date. The client computer provide the server with a UNIX timestamp of the beginning of that day($unix) and a date($date) in the format nnnn-mm-dd to select the correct dates.

The problem is, I don't know how to select those days that are occurring as specified above. This solution is not applicable for me, even though it works:

SELECT *
  FROM events
 WHERE startDate >= '$date'
   OR startTime >= '$unix'

The thing is I have in some rows where unix time stamp is provided in startTime, I also have a date provided in startDate and other reason I which I don't want to explain. And because of that I can't use the solution above.

I need some kind of solution that have an IF statement inside the Where clause like:

SELECT *
  FROM events
 WHERE IF(startTime = NULL, startDate >= '$date', startTime >= '$unix')

I'm just guessing this solution. But is it right?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
WHERE (startTime IS NULL AND startDate >= '$date')
   OR (startTime IS NOT NULL AND startTime >= '$unix')
share|improve this answer
    
Why two NULL NULL? –  einstein May 13 '11 at 4:32
1  
@Woho87 : you can never have enough NULL! ;) –  Mitch Wheat May 13 '11 at 4:35
    
@Woho87: there is no two nulls. Was in the first revision but I fixed that typo after 10 seconds. –  zerkms May 13 '11 at 4:35

All SQL dialects support CASE WHEN:

SELECT *
 FROM events
WHERE CASE WHEN startTime is null
           THEN startDate >= '$date'
           ELSE startTime >= '$unix'
share|improve this answer
    
And this will not be optimized to be using indexes. –  zerkms May 13 '11 at 4:31

You just need some combined boolean logic in the WHERE clause:

SELECT * 
FROM events
WHERE 
    (startDate IS NULL AND startTime >= '$unix') OR
    (startTime IS NULL AND startDate >= '$date')
share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure we need IS NULL in both cases? If so - why don't move it out the parentheses. –  zerkms May 13 '11 at 4:37
    
@zerkms: different variables...I'm going by my interpretation of the posters requirements, which may or may not be correct: "The "database stores UNIX time stamp(number of seconds since UNIX epok) in the column startTime, while startDate is NULL. If the user only provide a start date, the database stores the date in format nnnn-mm-dd in startDate and NULL in ´startTime`. –  Mitch Wheat May 13 '11 at 4:38
    
hehe, and I tried to write my answer according his IF supposition... Which represents different logic :-S –  zerkms May 13 '11 at 4:41
SELECT * 
FROM events 
WHERE 
  (startDate >= '$date' OR startTime >= '$unix')
AND 
  startDate != NULL

This will not return any row that has null value for startDate

share|improve this answer
2  
!= NULL is always evaluated to FALSE –  zerkms May 13 '11 at 4:34
    
AND startDate IS NOT NULL is what you're looking for there @Ibu. –  phpguru May 21 at 14:36

I'm assuming that you want to use startDate when startDate is not null, and startTime when startTime is not null... then try this...


SELECT * 
FROM events
WHERE (startTime is not NULL and startDate >= '$date') 
OR (startTime is not NULL and startTime >= '$unix') 

You can use the CASE statement also, but this makes more sense is more readable.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.