Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

(how) can I Inherit from Boolean? (Or make my class comparable to Boolean with '=' Operator)

class MyClass : Boolean
{
    public MyClass()
    {
        this = true;
    }
}
class Program
{
    public Program()
    {
        MyClass myClass = new MyClass();
        if(myClass == true)
            //do something...
        else
            //do something else...
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why would you want to inherit from Boolean? With inheritance, it must fufill the "is a" relationship. Is your class a boolean? –  Stealth Rabbi Nov 28 '11 at 17:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Simple example:

public class MyClass {
    private bool isTrue = true;

    public static bool operator ==(MyClass a, bool b)
    {
        if (a == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        return a.isTrue == b;
    }

    public static bool operator !=(MyClass a, bool b)
    {
        return !(a == b);
    }
}

somewhere in code you can compare your object with boolean value:

MyClass a = new MyClass();
if ( a == true ) { // it compares with a.isTrue property as defined in == operator overloading method
   // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
However, I won't recommend anybody this pattern. == operator overloading is not clear to understand, because most programmers consider it as object reference equality check or primitive data types equality check. In code (a == true) "a"-variable will be considered by everyone as bool data type and will be confused. Operator overload should be avoided, I wonder why Microsoft added this feature in C#. –  meir May 13 '11 at 8:59

You can't. System.Boolean is a struct, and you can't derive from structs.

Now, why do you want to do so, exactly? What's the bigger purpose?

You could include an implicit conversion operator from your class to bool, but personally I wouldn't. I would almost always prefer to expose a property, so you'd write:

if (myValue.MyProperty)

... I think that keeps things clear. But if you could give us more of the real context, we may be able to give more concrete advice.

share|improve this answer

while your example wouldnt work, you can do something similar for your own classes to test if one equals the values of another.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173147(v=vs.80).aspx

public static bool operator ==(ThreeDPoint a, ThreeDPoint b)
{
    // If both are null, or both are same instance, return true.
    if (System.Object.ReferenceEquals(a, b))
    {
        return true;
    }

    // If one is null, but not both, return false.
    if (((object)a == null) || ((object)b == null))
    {
        return false;
    }

    // Return true if the fields match:
    return a.x == b.x && a.y == b.y && a.z == b.z;
}

public static bool operator !=(ThreeDPoint a, ThreeDPoint b)
{
    return !(a == b);
}
share|improve this answer

You can ("or make my class comparable..."), by overriding the == operator. I presume Jon Skeet overlooked that part of the question.

share|improve this answer

You can use an implicit conversion operator to have this code:

class MyClass {
  public bool Value { get; set; }
  public MyClass() {
    Value = true;
  }
  public static implicit operator bool(MyClass m) {
    return m != null && m.Value;
  }
}

class Program {
  public static void Main() {
    var myClass = new MyClass();
    if (myClass) { // MyClass can be treated like a Boolean
      Console.WriteLine("myClass is true");
    }
    else {
      Console.WriteLine("myClass is false");
    }
  }
}

It can be used as above:

if (myClass) ...

Or like this:

if (myClass == true) ...
share|improve this answer

If you want to be able to use your value in 'if' statements, define operator true and operator false (along with the & and | operators if you want to use && and ||.) (VB equivalents)

To answer more, I would have to know what you're trying to do (in other words, why not just use bool directly?)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.