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I thought characters in java are 16 bits as suggested in java doc. Isn't it the case for strings? I have a code that stores an object into a file:

public static void storeNormalObj(File outFile, Object obj) {
    FileOutputStream fos = null;
    ObjectOutputStream oos = null;
    try {
        fos = new FileOutputStream(outFile);
        oos = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
        oos.writeObject(obj);
        oos.flush();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        try {
            oos.close();
            try {
                fos.close();
            } catch (Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Basically, I tried to store an string "abcd" in to file "output", when I opened up output with an editor and deleted the none string part, what's left is just the string "abcd", which is 4 bytes in total. Anyone knows why? Does java automatically saves space by using ASCII instead of UNICODE for Strings that can be supported by ASCII? Thanks

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3  
Just a thought: couldn't it be that Java saves in UTF-8? –  Rekin May 13 '11 at 6:48
    
Yes, exactly - it stores Strings in modified UTF-8... –  MJB May 13 '11 at 6:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

(I think by "none string part" you are referring to the bytes that ObjectOutputStream emits when you create it. It is possible you don't want to use ObjectOutputStream, but I don't know your requirements.)

Just FYI, Unicode and UTF-8 are not the same thing. Unicode is a standard that specifies, amongst other things, what characters are available. UTF-8 is a character encoding that specifies how these characters shall be physically encoded in 1s and 0s. UTF-8 can use 1 byte for ASCII (<= 127) and up to 4 bytes to represent other Unicode characters.

UTF-8 is a strict superset of ASCII. So even if you specify a UTF-8 encoding for a file and you write "abcd" to it, it will contain just those four bytes: they have the same physical encoding in ASCII as they do in UTF-8.

Your method uses ObjectOutputStream which actually has a significantly different encoding than either ASCII or UTF-8! If you read the Javadoc carefully, if obj is a string and has already occurred in the stream, subsequent calls to writeObject will cause a reference to the previous string to be emitted, potentially causing many fewer bytes to be written in the case of repeated strings.

If you're serious about understanding this, you really should spend a good amount of time reading about Unicode and character encoding systems. Wikipedia has an excellent article on Unicode as a start.

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One other important thing about the in memory representation of unicode strings is that a unicode codepoint doesn't always fit into a 16 bit char. –  CodesInChaos May 13 '11 at 8:04
    
@CodeInChaos - Can you provide some scenarios where this exceeds 16bits? –  Manimaran Selvan May 13 '11 at 9:48
    
Any character not in the basic plane has a codepoint larger than 2^16-1. So UTF-16 encodes it into two 16 bit chars. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-16/UCS-2 –  CodesInChaos May 13 '11 at 10:01

Yea, the char is only Unicode within the context of the Java runtime environment. If you wish to write it using 16-bit encoding, use a FileWriter.

    FileWriter outputStream = null;

    try {
        outputStream = new FileWriter("myfilename.dat");

        int c;
        while ((c = inputStream.read()) != -1) {
            outputStream.write(c);
        }
    } finally {
        if (outputStream != null) {
            outputStream.close();
        }
    }
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I don't think you are understanding the point Pal- he's asking why a outputstream is writing single bytes. And the answer I believe is my answer below. –  MJB May 13 '11 at 6:51
1  
@MJB - No, the encoding matters. If he writes using a 16bit encoding, the operating system will consider it and allocate 16 bits for single char. Though again it is up to the operating system. –  Manimaran Selvan May 13 '11 at 7:04
1  
I would not suggest using FileWriter, because it has no way to specify the encoding and only supports the default encoding. The (unfortunately more verbose) new OutputStreamWriter(new FileOutputStream(file), encoding) is the better choice. –  Joachim Sauer May 13 '11 at 7:30

If you look at the source of String, it will note that it calls DataOutput.writeUTF to write Strings. And if you read that you'll find out they are written as "modified UTF-8". The details are lengthy, but if you don't use non 7 bit ascii, yes, it will take one byte. If you want the gory details look at the EXTREMELY long javadoc in DataOutput.writeUTF()

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You may be interested to know there is a -XX:+UseCompressedStrings option in Java Update 21 performance release and later. This will allows String to use a byte[] for strings which do not need a char[]

Despite the Java Hotspot VM Options guide suggesting it may be on by default, this may only be for performance releases. It only appears to work for me if I turn it on explicitly.

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So do you expect a 16*4=64 bits = 8 bytes file? More than UTF-8 or ASCII encoding. Once the file is written to a file. The memory (in terms of space) management is up to the operating system. And your code doesn't have a control on it.

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That's not true, your code can absolutely control how the output is encoded. –  sjr May 13 '11 at 7:08
    
I do understand. But even when you specify, it is up to the operating system to manage the space it needs. (Please understand that, I'm not opposing that the operating system will change the encoding) –  Manimaran Selvan May 13 '11 at 7:12
    
See my comment on @Pål Brattberg's answer.. –  Manimaran Selvan May 13 '11 at 7:13
    
@sjr - Actually +1 for your answer. It clearly states. If you write abcd to a file, operating system (though the encoding is UTF-8) will allocate 1 byte only (because it is enough).. –  Manimaran Selvan May 13 '11 at 7:16
    
The operating system has nothing to do with how java encoding a string when serializing. –  CodesInChaos May 13 '11 at 8:01

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