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I tried the following program on Visual Studio 2010.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A {
public:
        int p;

        /*A(){
            cout << "Constructor A" << endl;
        }*/

        ~A(){
            cout << "Destructor in A" << endl;
        }
};

class D: public A
{
public: 

        /*D(){
            cout << "Constructor D" << endl;
        }*/

        ~D(){
            cout << "Destructor in D" << endl;
        }
};

int main()
{
    D d =  D();
    cout << "Exiting main" << endl;
}

The output that I got was -

Destructor in D
Destructor in A
Exiting main
Destructor in D
Destructor in A

I am not able to understand why the destructor of class D and A are being called before "Exiting main" statement is executed?

I tried another thing - I uncommented the Class D constructor in the code above, then the output was as I expected -

Constructor D
Exiting main
Destructor in D
Destructor in A

What am I missing here?

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1 Answer

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The line

D d =  D();

first creates a temporary, unnamed object, which then is copied to d. What you see is the temporary object being destroyed when the statement is ended. The named object d is destroyed when it goes out of scope, after main() is completed.

If you add a copy constructor to D you'll see that it is invoked.

When commenting out the constructor I think that you see the expected behaviour because the compiler can do some optimizations.

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Doesn't explain why the second example doesn't print out the destructor calls anymore. –  Xeo May 13 '11 at 6:49
    
You could tell how it should be (: –  Kiril Kirov May 13 '11 at 6:50
    
The compiler is only allowed to make unobservable optimizations. Even if it does copy elision, the call should still be printed. –  Xeo May 13 '11 at 6:52
    
Hm, even with O0, gcc still does not create a temp object...interesting –  Kiril Kirov May 13 '11 at 6:56
10  
@Xeo The C++ Standard says that compiler is allowed to elide the copy constructor in almost all cases, even when the copy constructor has side effects. –  nbt May 13 '11 at 6:57
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