Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way to define different mock-expects for different input arguments? For example, I have database layer class called DB. This class has method called "Query ( string $query )", that method takes an SQL query string on input. Can I create mock for this class (DB) and set different return values for different Query method calls that depends on input query string?

share|improve this question
    
In addition to the answer below, you can also use the method in this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/5484602/… –  Schleis Apr 8 '13 at 15:32
    
I like this answer stackoverflow.com/a/10964562/614709 –  yitznewton Jan 24 at 13:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 44 down vote accepted

The PHPUnit Mocking library (by default) determines whether an expectation matches based solely on the matcher passed to expects parameter and the constraint passed to method. Because of this, two expect calls that only differ in the arguments passed to with will fail because both will match but only one will verify as having the expected behavior. See the reproduction case after the actual working example.


For you problem you need to use ->at() or ->will($this->returnCallback( as outlined in another question on the subject.

Example:

<?php

class DB {
    public function Query($sSql) {
        return "";
    }
}

class fooTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase {


    public function testMock() {

        $mock = $this->getMock('DB', array('Query'));

        $mock
            ->expects($this->exactly(2))
            ->method('Query')
            ->with($this->logicalOr(
                 $this->equalTo('select * from roles'),
                 $this->equalTo('select * from users')
             ))
            ->will($this->returnCallback(array($this, 'myCallback')));

        var_dump($mock->Query("select * from users"));
        var_dump($mock->Query("select * from roles"));
    }

    public function myCallback($foo) {
        return "Called back: $foo";
    }
}

Repoduces:

phpunit foo.php
PHPUnit 3.5.13 by Sebastian Bergmann.

string(32) "Called back: select * from users"
string(32) "Called back: select * from roles"
.

Time: 0 seconds, Memory: 4.25Mb

OK (1 test, 1 assertion)


Reproduce why two ->with() calls dont' work:

<?php

class DB {
    public function Query($sSql) {
        return "";
    }
}

class fooTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase {


    public function testMock() {

        $mock = $this->getMock('DB', array('Query'));
        $mock
            ->expects($this->once())
            ->method('Query')
            ->with($this->equalTo('select * from users'))
            ->will($this->returnValue(array('fred', 'wilma', 'barney')));

        $mock
            ->expects($this->once())
            ->method('Query')
            ->with($this->equalTo('select * from roles'))
            ->will($this->returnValue(array('admin', 'user')));

        var_dump($mock->Query("select * from users"));
        var_dump($mock->Query("select * from roles"));
    }

}

Results in

 phpunit foo.php
PHPUnit 3.5.13 by Sebastian Bergmann.

F

Time: 0 seconds, Memory: 4.25Mb

There was 1 failure:

1) fooTest::testMock
Failed asserting that two strings are equal.
--- Expected
+++ Actual
@@ @@
-select * from roles
+select * from users

/home/.../foo.php:27

FAILURES!
Tests: 1, Assertions: 0, Failures: 1
share|improve this answer
5  
thanks for your help! Your answer completely solved my problem. P.S. Sometimes TDD development seems terrifying to me when I have to use such large solutions for simple architecture :) –  Aleksei Kornushkin May 13 '11 at 12:38

It seems Mockery (https://github.com/padraic/mockery) supports this. In my case I want to check that 2 indices are created on a database:

Mockery, works:

use Mockery as m;

//...

$coll = m::mock(MongoCollection::class);
$db = m::mock(MongoDB::class);

$db->shouldReceive('selectCollection')->withAnyArgs()->times(1)->andReturn($coll);
$coll->shouldReceive('createIndex')->times(1)->with(['foo' => true]);
$coll->shouldReceive('createIndex')->times(1)->with(['bar' => true], ['unique' => true]);

new MyCollection($db);

PHPUnit, this fails:

$coll = $this->getMockBuilder(MongoCollection::class)->disableOriginalConstructor()->getMock();
$db  = $this->getMockBuilder(MongoDB::class)->disableOriginalConstructor()->getMock();

$db->expects($this->once())->method('selectCollection')->with($this->anything())->willReturn($coll);
$coll->expects($this->atLeastOnce())->method('createIndex')->with(['foo' => true]);
$coll->expects($this->atLeastOnce())->method('createIndex')->with(['bar' => true], ['unique' => true]);

new MyCollection($db);

Mockery also has a nicer syntax IMHO. It appears to be a tad slower than PHPUnits built-in mocking capability, but YMMV.

share|improve this answer

It's not ideal to use at() if you can avoid it because as their docs claim

The $index parameter for the at() matcher refers to the index, starting at zero, in all method invocations for a given mock object. Exercise caution when using this matcher as it can lead to brittle tests which are too closely tied to specific implementation details.

Since 4.1 (or maybe 4.0) you can use withConsecutive eg.

$mock->expects($this->exactly(2)) ->method('set') ->withConsecutive( array($this->equalTo('foo'), $this->greaterThan(0)), array($this->equalTo('bar'), $this->greaterThan(0)) );

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.