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I am not able to create a simple 3D sphere using the OpenGL library function glutSolidSphere() in C++.

Here's what I tried:

#include<GL/glu.h> 
void display() 
{ 
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT); 
    glColor3f(1.0,0.0,0.0); 
    glLoadIdentity(); 
    glutSolidSphere( 5.0, 20.0, 20.0); 
    glFlush(); 
} 

void myInit() 
{
    glClearColor(1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0); 
    glColor3f(1.0,0.0,0.0); 
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION); 
    glLoadIdentity(); 
    gluOrtho2D(0.0,499.0,0.0,499.0); 
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW); 
} 

void main(int argc,char **argv) 
{ 
    qobj = gluNewQuadric(); 
    glutInit(&argc,argv); 
    glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_SINGLE|GLUT_RGB); 
    glutInitWindowSize(500,500); 
    glutCreateWindow("pendulum");         
    glutDisplayFunc(display); 
    myInit(); 
    glutMainLoop(); 
}
share|improve this question
1  
Be more specific. What have you tried? –  Kiril Kirov May 13 '11 at 7:32
1  
Please show the code that doesn't work. –  Jackson Pope May 13 '11 at 7:36
    
@Kiril:I wanted to know how can i implement a 3D sphere for my mini project ,which is a pendulum, in opengl..am using visual c++. –  Lloyd May 13 '11 at 8:06
1  
#include<GL/glu.h> void display() { glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT); glColor3f(1.0,0.0,0.0); glLoadIdentity(); glutSolidSphere( 5.0, 20.0, 20.0); glFlush(); } void myInit() {glClearColor(1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0); glColor3f(1.0,0.0,0.0); glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION); glLoadIdentity(); gluOrtho2D(0.0,499.0,0.0,499.0); glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW); } void main(int argc,char **argv) { qobj = gluNewQuadric(); glutInit(&argc,argv); glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_SINGLE|GLUT_RGB); glutInitWindowSize(500,500); glutCreateWindow("pendulum"); glutDisplayFunc(display); myInit(); glutMainLoop(); } –  Lloyd May 13 '11 at 8:12
1  
@Lloyd - I've added the code to the original question, you should do that in future... there is a little "edit" button at the bottom. –  Dennis May 13 '11 at 8:58

5 Answers 5

In OpenGL you don't create objects, you just draw them. Once they are drawn, OpenGL no longer cares about what geometry you sent it.

glutSolidSphere is just sending drawing commands to OpenGL. However there's nothing special in and about it. And since it's tied to GLUT I'd not use it. Instead, if you really need some sphere in your code, how about create if for yourself?

#include <GL/gl.h>
#include <GL/glu.h>
#include <vector>
#include <cmath>

// your framework of choice here

class SolidSphere
{
protected:
    std::vector<GLfloat> vertices;
    std::vector<GLfloat> normals;
    std::vector<GLfloat> texcoords;
    std::vector<GLushort> indices;

public:
    SolidSphere(float radius, unsigned int rings, unsigned int sectors)
    {
        float const R = 1./(float)(rings-1);
        float const S = 1./(float)(sectors-1);
        int r, s;

        vertices.resize(rings * sectors * 3);
        normals.resize(rings * sectors * 3);
        texcoords.resize(rings * sectors * 2);
        std::vector<GLfloat>::iterator v = vertices.begin();
        std::vector<GLfloat>::iterator n = normals.begin();
        std::vector<GLfloat>::iterator t = texcoords.begin();
        for(r = 0; r < rings; r++) for(s = 0; s < sectors; s++) {
                float const y = sin( -M_PI_2 + M_PI * r * R );
                float const x = cos(2*M_PI * s * S) * sin( M_PI * r * R );
                float const z = sin(2*M_PI * s * S) * sin( M_PI * r * R );

                *t++ = s*S;
                *t++ = r*R;

                *v++ = x * radius;
                *v++ = y * radius;
                *v++ = z * radius;

                *n++ = x;
                *n++ = y;
                *n++ = z;
        }

        indices.resize(rings * sectors * 4);
        std::vector<GLushort>::iterator i = indices.begin();
        for(r = 0; r < rings-1; r++) for(s = 0; s < sectors-1; s++) {
                *i++ = r * sectors + s;
                *i++ = r * sectors + (s+1);
                *i++ = (r+1) * sectors + (s+1);
                *i++ = (r+1) * sectors + s;
        }
    }

    void draw(GLfloat x, GLfloat y, GLfloat z)
    {
        glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
        glPushMatrix();
        glTranslatef(x,y,z);

        glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
        glEnableClientState(GL_NORMAL_ARRAY);
        glEnableClientState(GL_TEXTURE_COORD_ARRAY);

        glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, 0, &vertices[0]);
        glNormalPointer(GL_FLOAT, 0, &normals[0]);
        glTexCoordPointer(2, GL_FLOAT, 0, &texcoords[0]);
        glDrawElements(GL_QUADS, indices.size(), GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT, &indices[0]);
        glPopMatrix();
    }
};

SolidSphere sphere(1, 12, 24);

void display()
{
    int const win_width  = …; // retrieve window dimensions from
    int const win_height = …; // framework of choice here
    float const win_aspect = (float)win_width / (float)win_height;

    glViewport(0, 0, win_width, win_height);

    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glLoadIdentity();
    gluPerspective(45, win_aspect, 1, 10);

    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
    glLoadIdentity();

#ifdef DRAW_WIREFRAME
    glPolygonMode(GL_FRONT_AND_BACK, GL_LINE);
#endif
    sphere.draw(0, 0, -5);

    swapBuffers();
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    // initialize and register your framework of choice here
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent stuff - do you have code to generate the texture co-ords as well? –  trojanfoe May 13 '11 at 9:20
    
@trojanfoe: Depends on what kind of mapping you're interested. Spheres have two poles, at which it's difficult to supply proper texture coordinates. But a good choice is simply using the spherical coordinates, mapped to ST. See my edit. –  datenwolf May 13 '11 at 9:32
1  
@datenwolf: Ok, I'll look into that. I have implemented the code above (I assume the glDrawElement() call should be using GL_UNSIGNED_INT given the vector stores GLuints) but it's just generating the lower quarter of the sphere and also backface culling is culling the outside of the sphere, unless I use glFrontFace(GL_CW) to change the winding. Can you help with these problems? Sorry to be a pain - I know what it's like to try and help and then be burdened with support requests :-/ –  trojanfoe May 13 '11 at 10:18
1  
@datenwolf: OK, will do - and the issue with the rendering? Are you sure the indices are being populated correctly? –  trojanfoe May 13 '11 at 11:32
2  
@toeplitz: Okay, I fixed all the issues. –  datenwolf Dec 29 '12 at 15:32

It doesn't seem like anyone so far has addressed the actual problem with your original code, so I thought I would do that even though the question is quite old at this point.

The problem originally had to do with the projection in relation to the radius and position of the sphere. I think you'll find that the problem isn't too complicated. The program actually works correctly, it's just that what is being drawn is very hard to see.

First, an orthogonal projection was created using the call

gluOrtho2D(0.0, 499.0, 0.0, 499.0);

which "is equivalent to calling glOrtho with near = -1 and far = 1." This means that the viewing frustum has a depth of 2. So a sphere with a radius of anything greater than 1 (diameter = 2) will not fit entirely within the viewing frustum.

Then the calls

glLoadIdentity();
glutSolidSphere(5.0, 20.0, 20.0);

are used, which loads the identity matrix of the model-view matrix and then "[r]enders a sphere centered at the modeling coordinates origin of the specified radius." Meaning, the sphere is rendered at the origin, (x, y, z) = (0, 0, 0), and with a radius of 5.

Now, the issue is three-fold:

  1. Since the window is 500x500 pixels and the width and height of the viewing frustum is almost 500 (499.0), the small radius of the sphere (5.0) makes its projected area only slightly over one fiftieth (2*5/499) of the size of the window in each dimension. This means that the apparent size of the sphere would be roughly 1/2,500th (actually pi*5^2/499^2, which is closer to about 1/3170th) of the entire window, so it might be difficult to see. This is assuming the entire circle is drawn within the area of the window. It is not, however, as we will see in point 2.
  2. Since the viewing frustum has it's left plane at x = 0 and bottom plane at y = 0, the sphere will be rendered with its geometric center in the very bottom left corner of the window so that only one quadrant of the projected sphere will be visible! This means that what would be seen is even smaller, about 1/10,000th (actually pi*5^2/(4*499^2), which is closer to 1/12,682nd) of the window size. This would make it even more difficult to see. Especially since the sphere is rendered so close to the edges/corner of the screen where you might not think to look.
  3. Since the depth of the viewing frustum is significantly smaller than the diameter of the sphere (less than half), only a sliver of the sphere will be within the viewing frustum, rendering only that part. So you will get more like a hollow circle on the screen than a solid sphere/circle. As it happens, the thickness of that sliver might represent less than 1 pixel on the screen which means we might even see nothing on the screen, even if part of the sphere is indeed within the viewing frustum.

The solution is simply to change the viewing frustum and radius of the sphere. For instance,

gluOrtho2D(-5.0, 5.0, -5.0, 5.0);
glutSolidSphere(5.0, 20, 20);

renders the following image.

r = 5.0

As you can see, only a small part is visible around the "equator", of the sphere with a radius of 5. (I changed the projection to fill the window with the sphere.) Another example,

gluOrtho2D(-1.1, 1.1, -1.1, 1.1);
glutSolidSphere(1.1, 20, 20);

renders the following image.

r = 1.1

The image above shows more of the sphere inside of the viewing frustum, but still the sphere is 0.2 depth units larger than the viewing frustum. As you can see, the "ice caps" of the sphere are missing, both the north and the south. So, if we want the entire sphere to fit within the viewing frustum which has depth 2, we must make the radius less than or equal to 1.

gluOrtho2D(-1.0, 1.0, -1.0, 1.0);
glutSolidSphere(1.0, 20, 20);

renders the following image.

r = 1.0

I hope this has helped someone. Take care!

share|improve this answer
3  
This should be the accepted answer for the actual question by the OP. –  legends2k Mar 19 '14 at 3:18
    
Thank you for that feedback, @legends2k. I added some more detail regarding the exact proportions of projected area that makes the circle very difficult to see when it is being drawn in the corner of the window. This in order to more clearly explain where I am getting my numbers and why the circle isn't being shown even though it is being drawn. –  Victor Zamanian Mar 26 '14 at 11:42

I don't understand how can datenwolf`s index generation can be correct. But still I find his solution rather clear. This is what I get after some thinking:

inline void push_indices(vector<GLushort>& indices, int sectors, int r, int s) {
    int curRow = r * sectors;
    int nextRow = (r+1) * sectors;

    indices.push_back(curRow + s);
    indices.push_back(nextRow + s);
    indices.push_back(nextRow + (s+1));

    indices.push_back(curRow + s);
    indices.push_back(nextRow + (s+1));
    indices.push_back(curRow + (s+1));
}

void createSphere(vector<vec3>& vertices, vector<GLushort>& indices, vector<vec2>& texcoords,
             float radius, unsigned int rings, unsigned int sectors)
{
    float const R = 1./(float)(rings-1);
    float const S = 1./(float)(sectors-1);

    for(int r = 0; r < rings; ++r) {
        for(int s = 0; s < sectors; ++s) {
            float const y = sin( -M_PI_2 + M_PI * r * R );
            float const x = cos(2*M_PI * s * S) * sin( M_PI * r * R );
            float const z = sin(2*M_PI * s * S) * sin( M_PI * r * R );

            texcoords.push_back(vec2(s*S, r*R));
            vertices.push_back(vec3(x,y,z) * radius);
            push_indices(indices, sectors, r, s);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You should indicate that this answer does not uses glutSolidSphere as the question called for it. –  Tibo Dec 12 '12 at 19:15
    
:) you a right. I just found this question seeking for a manual generation method WITHOUT glutSolidSphere... –  coin Dec 20 '12 at 8:24
    
btw datenwolf`s index generation appears to be correct. But I did't know about ogl capability to draw a square instead of triangle. I'm noob in this. –  coin Dec 20 '12 at 8:27
    
Is this version better for buffer object creation to have higher speed of drawing while elliminating pci-e actions? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 25 '13 at 19:25
    
one quesiton from a java developer: what is M_PI_2 ?? –  T_01 Aug 28 '14 at 21:50

Datanewolf's code is ALMOST right. I had to reverse both the winding and the normals to make it work properly with the fixed pipeline. The below works correctly with cull on or off for me:

    std::vector<GLfloat> vertices;
    std::vector<GLfloat> normals;
    std::vector<GLfloat> texcoords;
    std::vector<GLushort> indices;

    float const R = 1./(float)(rings-1);
    float const S = 1./(float)(sectors-1);
    int r, s;

    vertices.resize(rings * sectors * 3);
    normals.resize(rings * sectors * 3);
    texcoords.resize(rings * sectors * 2);
    std::vector<GLfloat>::iterator v = vertices.begin();
    std::vector<GLfloat>::iterator n = normals.begin();
    std::vector<GLfloat>::iterator t = texcoords.begin();
    for(r = 0; r < rings; r++) for(s = 0; s < sectors; s++) {
        float const y = sin( -M_PI_2 + M_PI * r * R );
        float const x = cos(2*M_PI * s * S) * sin( M_PI * r * R );
        float const z = sin(2*M_PI * s * S) * sin( M_PI * r * R );

        *t++ = s*S;
        *t++ = r*R;

        *v++ = x * radius;
        *v++ = y * radius;
        *v++ = z * radius;

        *n++ = -x;
        *n++ = -y;
        *n++ = -z;
    }

    indices.resize(rings * sectors * 4);
    std::vector<GLushort>::iterator i = indices.begin();
    for(r = 0; r < rings-1; r++)
        for(s = 0; s < sectors-1; s++) {
           /* 
            *i++ = r * sectors + s;
            *i++ = r * sectors + (s+1);
            *i++ = (r+1) * sectors + (s+1);
            *i++ = (r+1) * sectors + s;
            */
             *i++ = (r+1) * sectors + s;
             *i++ = (r+1) * sectors + (s+1);
            *i++ = r * sectors + (s+1);
             *i++ = r * sectors + s;

    }

Edit: There was a question on how to draw this... in my code I encapsulate these values in a G3DModel class. This is my code to setup the frame, draw the model, and end it:

void GraphicsProvider3DPriv::BeginFrame()const{
        int win_width;
        int win_height;// framework of choice here
        glfwGetWindowSize(window, &win_width, &win_height); // retrieve window
        float const win_aspect = (float)win_width / (float)win_height;
        // set lighting
        glEnable(GL_LIGHTING);
        glEnable(GL_LIGHT0);
        glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);
        GLfloat lightpos[] = {0, 0.0, 0, 0.};
        glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_POSITION, lightpos);
        GLfloat lmodel_ambient[] = { 0.2, 0.2, 0.2, 1.0 };
        glLightModelfv(GL_LIGHT_MODEL_AMBIENT, lmodel_ambient);
        glLightModeli(GL_LIGHT_MODEL_TWO_SIDE, GL_TRUE);
        // set up world transform
        glClearColor(0.f, 0.f, 0.f, 1.f);
        glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT|GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT|GL_STENCIL_BUFFER_BIT|GL_ACCUM_BUFFER_BIT);
        glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
        glLoadIdentity();

        gluPerspective(45, win_aspect, 1, 10);

        glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);

    }


    void GraphicsProvider3DPriv::DrawModel(const G3DModel* model, const Transform3D transform)const{
        G3DModelPriv* privModel = (G3DModelPriv *)model;
        glPushMatrix();
        glLoadMatrixf(transform.GetOGLData());

        glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
        glEnableClientState(GL_NORMAL_ARRAY);
        glEnableClientState(GL_TEXTURE_COORD_ARRAY);

        glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, 0, &privModel->vertices[0]);
        glNormalPointer(GL_FLOAT, 0, &privModel->normals[0]);
        glTexCoordPointer(2, GL_FLOAT, 0, &privModel->texcoords[0]);

        glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);
        //glFrontFace(GL_CCW);
        glEnable(GL_CULL_FACE);
        glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0);
        glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, privModel->texname);

        glDrawElements(GL_QUADS, privModel->indices.size(), GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT, &privModel->indices[0]);
        glPopMatrix();
        glDisable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);

    }

    void GraphicsProvider3DPriv::EndFrame()const{
        /* Swap front and back buffers */
        glDisable(GL_LIGHTING);
        glDisable(GL_LIGHT0);
        glDisable(GL_CULL_FACE);
        glfwSwapBuffers(window);

        /* Poll for and process events */
        glfwPollEvents();
    }
share|improve this answer

Here's the code:

glPushMatrix();
glTranslatef(18,2,0);
glRotatef(angle, 0, 0, 0.7);
glColor3ub(0,255,255);
glutWireSphere(3,10,10);
glPopMatrix();
share|improve this answer
11  
It's always nice if you leave some words describing your code. –  smerny May 26 '13 at 15:36

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