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I need a timer equivalent which will periodically execute some specific actions (e.g. updating some progress in the database or checking for new Jobs to execute in a database).

These actions are bound to a WaitHandle which specifies if the job needs to be executed or not. So basically this could be, for example, an AutoResetEvent which is set from outside when there is a new Entity in a database and trigger the search for these new Entities. The timer is necessary because I want to limit the number of queries to the database. So if 10 new notifications arrive, the AutomaticResetEvent will only be set one time and there will be also only one query for all of these.

My first attempts looks like this:

class ConditionalScheduler
{
    public void AddConditionalAction(WaitHandle handle, Action action)
    {
        lock (syncRoot)
        {
            handles.Add(handle);
            actions.Add(handle, action);
        }
    }

    private readonly object syncRoot = new object();

    private readonly Dictionary<WaitHandle, Action> actions = new Dictionary<WaitHandle, Action>();
    private readonly List<WaitHandle> handles = new List<WaitHandle>();

    public void RunTimerLoop()
    {
        do
        {
            WaitHandle[] waitHandles = handles.ToArray();
            int index = WaitHandle.WaitAny(waitHandles);

            if (index >= 0)
            {
                WaitHandle handle = waitHandles[index];

                Action action;
                lock (syncRoot)
                {
                    action = actions[handle];
                }

                action();
            }
            Thread.Sleep(5000);
        } while (true);
    }

The problem with this approach is that WaitHandle.WaitAny will only give me the Index of the first WaitHandle that is triggered. So if I have 2 or more WaitHandles which are triggered, then I will only execute the first actions and not the other ones.

Do you have a better design to achieve the required results of executing all actions which were triggered within the specified time period? If it simplifies the matter I could use another kind of notification mechanism instead of WaitHandles.

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe you could go with a two thread queue / bulk execution? Note that the code down is just a concept I'm writing without visual studio so I'm doing on a list, this had better to be done with a Queue but I don't remember the syntax without intellisense :) ...

private readonly Dictionary<WaitHandle, Action> actions = new Dictionary<WaitHandle, Action>();
    private readonly List<WaitHandle> handles = new List<WaitHandle>();
    private readonly List<WaitHandle> triggeredHandles = new List<WaitHandle>();

// thread 1
    public void CheckLoop()
    {
        do
        {
            WaitHandle[] waitHandles = handles.ToArray();
            int index = WaitHandle.WaitAny(waitHandles);

            if (index >= 0)
            {
                lock (triggeredHandles)
                {
                   triggeredHandles.Add(waitHandles[index]);
                }

            }            
        } while (true);
    }

// thread 2
public void RunLoop()
    {
        do
        {
            lock(triggeredHandles)
            {
                foreach (var th in triggeredHandles) {

                   Action action;
                   lock (syncRoot)
                   {
                       action = actions[th];
                   }

                   action();                   
                }
                triggeredHandles.Clear();
            }
            Thread.Sleep(5000);
        } while (true);
    }
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This looks like it would work. But I was hoping for a solution which involves only one thread... It seems a bit heavy for me using 2 threads for this. –  aKzenT May 13 '11 at 9:11
    
open windows task manager and go to the Performance Tab, see how many Threads are running on your OS. I have 832 right now. So I think one mroe could not be that bad :D –  Marino Šimić May 13 '11 at 9:15
    
and btw this could be done in one thread: if you add handles to the queue and then not wait 5000, if there were more than X handles to execute, execute them all and then wait 5000 –  Marino Šimić May 13 '11 at 9:18
    
I solved it using only one thread: After the first WaitAny I call WaitOne on all remaining wait handles with timeout set to 0. This will return immediately, but still returns me if the WaitHandle is triggered or not. Not sure if this was what you meant, but I think it'll work. I'll accept this as the answer in any case, thanks! –  aKzenT May 13 '11 at 10:45
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Have you considered using of the the built in Timer classes? System.Threading.Timer is a light-weight implementation that uses the ThreadPool, or System.Timers.Timer which provides related events and more functionality.

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This doesn't really solve my problem. I know how to execute actions periodically. What I don't know is how to bring in the conditional behavior... –  aKzenT May 13 '11 at 9:09
    
@aKzenT: Sure, but it's still worth noting that Thread.Sleep suffers from a few problems: It's not accurate in a timing sense, it reserves a thread but doesn't let it do any work, and it can't be interrupted. –  Phil Gan May 13 '11 at 9:33
    
+1, you are correct, although in my case accuracy is not really that important... What I don't like in these timer classes is that they run on the ThreadPool. I would like to have the "ticks" always be on the same thread. Not sure how to solve this using timer classes. –  aKzenT May 13 '11 at 10:48
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You'll probably save yourself a lot of hassle by using Reactive Extensions (Rx) - it has lots of great ways to compose events in the sort of manner you're requesting.

This site is a handy way to see the sort of things rx can do.

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