Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I get the path of the directory in which a Bash script is located FROM that Bash script?

For instance, let's say I want to use a Bash script as a launcher for another application. I want to change the working directory to the one where the Bash script is located, so I can operate on the files in that directory, like so:

$ ./application
share|improve this question
19  
None of the current solutions work if there are any newlines at the end of the directory name - They will be stripped by the command substitution. To work around this you can append a non-newline character inside the command substitution - DIR="$( cd "$( dirname "${BASH_SOURCE[0]}" )" && pwd && echo x)" - and remove it without a command substitution - DIR="${DIR%x}". –  l0b0 Sep 24 '12 at 12:15
5  
@l0b0 Can you suggest a real world situation where a directory would have a newline at the end? I think that would tend to be rather unhelpful. Typing it in the shell sounds very difficult, and I can't imagine how it would help users understand the purpose of the directory (which I view as the reason for naming). –  jpmc26 Mar 27 '13 at 23:02
25  
@jpmc26 There are two very common situations: Accidents and sabotage. A script shouldn't fail in unpredictable ways just because someone, somewhere, did a mkdir $'\n'. –  l0b0 Mar 28 '13 at 8:14
10  
Just FYI: in Windows cmd, it's %~dp0. –  SiPlus May 7 '13 at 14:13

42 Answers 42

Use a combination of readlink to canonicalize the name (with a bonus of following it back to its source if it is a symlink) and dirname to extract the directory name:

script="`readlink -f "${BASH_SOURCE[0]}"`"
dir="`dirname "$script"`"
share|improve this answer

I usually include the following at the top of my scripts which works in the majority of cases:

[ "$(dirname $0)" = '.' ] && SOURCE_DIR=$(pwd) || SOURCE_DIR=$(dirname $0);
ls -l $0 | grep -q ^l && SOURCE_DIR=$(ls -l $0 | awk '{print $NF}');

The first line assigns source based on the value of pwd if run from current path or dirname if called from elsewhere.

The second line examines the path to see if it is a symlink and if so, updates SOURCE_DIR to the location of the link itself.

There are probably better solutions out there but this is the cleanest I've managed to come up with myself.

share|improve this answer

Very late to the discussion, but try something like this:

function get_realpath() {

if [[ -f "$1" ]]
then
    # file *must* exist
    if cd "$(echo "${1%/*}")" &>/dev/null
    then
        # file *may* not be local
        # exception is ./file.ext
        # try 'cd .; cd -;' *works!*
        local tmppwd="$PWD"
        cd - &>/dev/null
    else
        # file *must* be local
        local tmppwd="$PWD"
    fi
else
    # file *cannot* exist
    return 1 # failure
fi

# reassemble realpath
echo "$tmppwd"/"${1##*/}"
return 0 # success

}

function get_dirname(){

local realpath="$(get_realpath "$1")"
if (( $? )) # true when non-zero.
then
    return $? # failure
fi
echo "${realpath%/*}"
return 0 # success

}

# Then from the top level:
get_dirname './script.sh'

# Or Within a script:
get_dirname "$0"

# Can even test the outcome!
if (( $? )) # true when non-zero.
then
    exit 1 # failure
fi

These functions and related tools are part of our product that has been made available to the community for free and can be found at GitHub as realpath-lib. It's simple, clean and well documented (great for learning), pure Bash and has no dependencies. Good for cross-platform use too. So for the above example, within a script you could simply:

source '/path/to/realpath-lib'

get_dirname "$0"

if (( $? )) # true when non-zero.
then
    exit 1 # failure
fi

That's all!

share|improve this answer

Here's an excerpt from my answer to shell script: check directory name and convert to lowercase in which I demonstrate not only how to solve this problem with very basic POSIX-specified utilities, I also address how to very simply store the function's results in a returned variable...

...Well, as you can see, with some help, I hit upon a pretty simple and very powerful solution:

I can pass the function a sort of messenger variable and dereference any explicit use of the resulting function's argument's $1 name with eval as necessary, and, upon the function routine's completion, I use eval and a backslashed quoting trick to assign my messenger variable the value I desire without ever having to know its name.

In full disclosure, ... [I found the messenger variable portion of this] and at Rich's sh tricks and I have also excerpted the relevant portion of his page below my own answer's excerpt.

... EXCERPT: ...

Though not strictly POSIX yet, realpath is a GNU core app since 2012. Full disclosure: never heard of it before I noticed it in the info coreutils TOC and immediately thought of [the linked] question, but using the following function as demonstrated should reliably, (soon POSIXLY?), and, I hope, efficiently provide its caller with an absolutely sourced $0:

% _abs_0() { 
> o1="${1%%/*}"; ${o1:="${1}"}; ${o1:=`realpath -s "${1}"`}; eval "$1=\${o1}"; 
> }  
% _abs_0 ${abs0:="${0}"} ; printf %s\\n "${abs0}"
/no/more/dots/in/your/path2.sh

EDIT: It may be worth highlighting that this solution uses POSIX parameter expansion to first check if the path actually needs expanding and resolving at all before attempting to do so. This should return an absolutely sourced $0via a messenger variable (with the notable exception that it will preserve symlinks) as efficiently as I could imagine it could be done whether or not the path is already absolute. ...

(minor edit: before finding realpath in the docs, I had at least pared down my version of [the version below] not to depend on the time field [as it does in the first ps command], but, fair warning, after testing some I'm less convinced ps is fully reliable in its command path expansion capacity)

On the other hand, you could do this:

ps ww -fp $$ | grep -Eo '/[^:]*'"${0#*/}"

eval "abs0=${`ps ww -fp $$ | grep -Eo ' /'`#?}"

... And from Rich's sh tricks: ...

Returning strings from a shell function

As can be seen from the above pitfall of command substitution, stdout is not a good avenue for shell functions to return strings to their caller, unless the output is in a format where trailing newlines are insignificant. Certainly such practice is not acceptable for functions meant to deal with arbitrary strings. So, what can be done?

Try this:

func () {
body here
eval "$1=\${foo}"
}

Of course ${foo} could be replaced by any sort of substitution. The key trick here is the eval line and the use of escaping. The “$1” is expanded when the argument to eval is constructed by the main command parser. But the “${foo}” is not expanded at this stage, because the “$” has been quoted. Instead, it’s expanded when eval evaluates its argument. If it’s not clear why this is important, consider how the following would be bad:

foo='hello ; rm -rf /'
dest=bar
eval "$dest=$foo"

But of course the following version is perfectly safe:

foo='hello ; rm -rf /'
dest=bar
eval "$dest=\$foo"

Note that in the original example, “$1” was used to allow the caller to pass the destination variable name as an argument the function. If your function needs to use the shift command, for instance to handle the remaining arguments as “$@”, then it may be useful to save the value of “$1” in a temporary variable at the beginning of the function.

share|improve this answer

You may try to define the following variable:

CWD="$(cd -P -- "$(dirname -- "$0")" && pwd -P)"

or you can try the following function in bash:

realpath () {
  [[ $1 = /* ]] && echo "$1" || echo "$PWD/${1#./}"
}

Related:

share|improve this answer
cur_dir=`old=\`pwd\`; cd \`dirname $0\`; echo \`pwd\`; cd $old;`
share|improve this answer

No forks (besides subshell) and can handle "alien" pathname forms like those with newlines as some would claim:

IFS= read -rd '' DIR < <([[ $BASH_SOURCE != */* ]] || cd "${BASH_SOURCE%/*}/" >&- && echo -n "$PWD")
share|improve this answer

This solution applies only to bash. Note that the commonly supplied answer ${BASH_SOURCE[0]} won't work if you try to find the path from within a function.

I've found this line to always work, regardless of whether the file is being sourced or run as a script.

dirname ${BASH_SOURCE[${#BASH_SOURCE[@]} - 1]}

If you want to follow symlinks use readlink on the path you get above, recursively or non-recursively.

Here's a script to try it out and compare it to other proposed solutions. Invoke it as source test1/test2/test_script.sh or bash test1/test2/test_script.sh.

#
# Location: test1/test2/test_script.sh
#
echo $0
echo $_
echo ${BASH_SOURCE}
echo ${BASH_SOURCE[${#BASH_SOURCE[@]} - 1]}

cur_file="${BASH_SOURCE[${#BASH_SOURCE[@]} - 1]}"
cur_dir="$(dirname "${cur_file}")"
source "${cur_dir}/func_def.sh"

function test_within_func_inside {
    echo ${BASH_SOURCE}
    echo ${BASH_SOURCE[${#BASH_SOURCE[@]} - 1]}
}

echo "Testing within function inside"
test_within_func_inside

echo "Testing within function outside"
test_within_func_outside

#
# Location: test1/test2/func_def.sh
#
function test_within_func_outside {
    echo ${BASH_SOURCE}
    echo ${BASH_SOURCE[${#BASH_SOURCE[@]} - 1]}
}

The reason the one-liner works is explained by the use of the BASH_SOURCE environment variable and its associate FUNCNAME.

BASH_SOURCE

An array variable whose members are the source filenames where the corresponding shell function names in the FUNCNAME array variable are defined. The shell function ${FUNCNAME[$i]} is defined in the file ${BASH_SOURCE[$i]} and called from ${BASH_SOURCE[$i+1]}.

FUNCNAME

An array variable containing the names of all shell functions currently in the execution call stack. The element with index 0 is the name of any currently-executing shell function. The bottom-most element (the one with the highest index) is "main". This variable exists only when a shell function is executing. Assignments to FUNCNAME have no effect and return an error status. If FUNCNAME is unset, it loses its special properties, even if it is subsequently reset.

This variable can be used with BASH_LINENO and BASH_SOURCE. Each element of FUNCNAME has corresponding elements in BASH_LINENO and BASH_SOURCE to describe the call stack. For instance, ${FUNCNAME[$i]} was called from the file ${BASH_SOURCE[$i+1]} at line number ${BASH_LINENO[$i]}. The caller builtin displays the current call stack using this information.

[Source: Bash manual]

share|improve this answer
FOLDERNAME=${PWD##*/}

that is the quickest way I know

share|improve this answer
ME=`type -p $0`
MDIR="${ME%/*}"
WORK_DIR=$(cd $MDIR && pwd)
share|improve this answer
function getScriptAbsoluteDir { # fold>>
    # @description used to get the script path
    # @param $1 the script $0 parameter
    local script_invoke_path="$1"
    local cwd=`pwd`

    # absolute path ? if so, the first character is a /
    if test "x${script_invoke_path:0:1}" = 'x/'
    then
        RESULT=`dirname "$script_invoke_path"`
    else
        RESULT=`dirname "$cwd/$script_invoke_path"`
    fi
} # <<fold
share|improve this answer
1  
-1: The function keyword isn't available on POSIX shells, and is a needlessly incompatible bash/ksh/&c. extension. Also, if you're on a shell new enough to have that extension, you don't need the test "x[...]" hack. –  Charles Duffy Jun 9 at 3:41

If $0 is an absolute path then you are done, and an alternative to dirname is just iterating through the paths defined in $PATH. The cd trick to make the path absolute can be combined with pushd/popd. Another option for an absolute path is to prefix the path with pwd if the path from dirname/basename is relative. Keep in mind that $0 can be supplied by the user and hence should not be trusted.

/Allan

share|improve this answer

protected by obi NullPoiиteя kenobi Jun 10 '13 at 5:06

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.